Best Tank Mates for Goldfish: Complete Review

Goldfish are a popular pet fish that come in a variety of colors, including red, orange, yellow, white, and black. They are a member of the carp family and can grow up to 12 inches …

Goldfish aquarium partners

Goldfish are a popular pet fish that come in a variety of colors, including red, orange, yellow, white, and black. They are a member of the carp family and can grow up to 12 inches long. Goldfish are cold-water fish and can live in water temperatures between 60 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit. They are hardy fish and can tolerate a wide range of water conditions.

Below we will tell you about good tank mates for goldfish.

What Kind of Fish Can You Keep With Goldfish?

Goldfish are a type of carp and can be kept with other types of carp and koi. Other fish that can be kept with goldfish in the community tanks include catfish, loaches, and other types of fish that are compatible with a cold water environment. Fish that require a warmer environment should not be kept with goldfish.

Live In The Same Temperature Range

Goldfish can be kept together with a variety of tropical fish as long as the temperature range is similar. Some good fish to keep with goldfish include guppies, platies, mollies, and swordtails. These fish can all live in water temperatures that are in the mid-70s. Bettas can also be kept with goldfish, but they require warmer water temperatures, typically in the upper 80s.

If you are looking to keep other types of tropical fish with goldfish, it is best to consult with an aquarium specialist to ensure the compatibility of the fish.

Stay Away From Small and Spiny Fish

Goldfish are a popular choice for a pet fish because they are hardy and can live in a variety of water conditions, but they are not always compatible with other small and prickly fish.

For example, small fish like tetras can be injured or eaten by goldfish, and some fish, like catfish and loaches, have spines that can injure goldfish.

Additionally, many small fish are schooling fish and prefer to live in groups, while goldfish are generally solitary fish and do not like to share their space. If you are interested in keeping a small fish tank, it is best to research which fish are compatible with goldfish.

Swimming Speed and Activity

Goldfish are a type of carp and are generally considered slow and docile fish. This, however, does not mean that they cannot live with other fast or active fish. In fact, goldfish can do quite well in a community tank with other fish that enjoy swimming around.

Some good examples of compatible fish with goldfish include Danios, Platies, and Guppies. These fish are all active and like to swim around, and they will not bother or stress out the goldfish.

On the other hand, there are some fish that should not be kept with goldfish. These include aggressive fish or sharp fins, as they can injure or even kill the goldfish.

They Need A Peaceful Temperament

Goldfish and other fish with a calm temperament can be compatible in a tank together. However, it is important to consider the size of the tank when choosing compatible fish. A small tank is not suitable for a large fish, and a large tank is not suitable for a small fish.

When choosing a tank mate for a goldfish, it is important to consider the temperament of the other fish. Some fish are very active and need a lot of space to swim, while others are calmer and can be content in a smaller tank.

22 Best Tank Mates for Goldfish

Goldfish are a popular aquarium fish, and many different types of fish make good partners for them. So, which fish can live with goldfish? Let’s find out.

1. Guppies

Guppies are one of the most popular fish kept in home aquariums. They are small, colorful, and very hardy. They can tolerate a wide range of water conditions and are easy to care for.

Guppies come from tropical areas of South America. In the wild, they live in shallow, fast-moving streams and rivers. They are schooling fish and prefer to live in groups.

Guppies are one of the most adaptable fish and can thrive in a wide range of water conditions. They do best in water that is slightly acidic and slightly warm. They can tolerate a pH range of 6.5 to 8.5 and a water temperature range of 68 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

Guppies are very active fish and require a lot of swimming space. They should be kept in an aquarium that is at least 20 gallons in size.

Guppies are easy to care for and can be kept by beginners. They require a diet of both live and dried foods. They will eat a wide variety of foods, including flakes, pellets, bloodworms, brine shrimp, and daphnia.

Guppies are prolific breeders and can produce dozens of offspring per month. If you are not interested in breeding guppies, keeping only a few males in your aquarium is best.

Guppies

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish and guppies are two of the most popular fish kept in aquariums. They are both small fish and are compatible with each other. They can be kept in the same tank, but it is important to make sure that the tank is large enough. Goldfish can grow up to 12 inches in length, while guppies only grow up to 2 inches in length.

Goldfish and guppies can be bred in the same tank. Guppies will breed quickly and can produce dozens of offspring. Goldfish will not breed as quickly, but they can still produce a few offspring. It is important to remove the fry (baby fish) from the tank when they are born so that they can be raised in a separate tank.

2. Corydoras Catfish

The Corydoras Catfish is a small freshwater fish that is native to South America. This fish is a popular choice for aquariums because it is hardy, peaceful, and relatively easy to care for.

The Corydoras Catfish has a torpedo-shaped body and a long, whip-like tail. It has a brown or black coloration with a light-colored stripe that runs along the length of its body. This fish typically grows to a length of 3-4 inches.

The Corydoras Catfish is a peaceful fish that does well when kept in groups. It can be kept with other small, non-aggressive fish species. This fish is a scavenger and will eat a variety of foods, including flakes, pellets, and live food.

Corydoras Catfish fish

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish and Corydoras Catfish will get along well in a tank together and can be housed in a 30-gallon tank or larger.

3. Hoplo Catfish

The Hoplo Catfish (Loricariidae) is a small, nocturnal freshwater fish native to South America. It is named for its unique hoplo-shaped body, which is adapted for life in swift-flowing rivers. The Hoplo Catfish is a popular aquarium fish and is often kept as a pet.

The Hoplo Catfish is a small fish growing to a maximum length of about 4 inches. It has a dark brown or black body, with a white or cream-colored belly. Its hoplo-shaped body is flat and disk-like, with a large head and small, barbels. The Hoplo Catfish is a nocturnal fish and is most active at night.

Hoplo Catfish Loricariidae

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish and Hoplo Catfish are both freshwater fish that can live in harmony with one another. Both fish are peaceful by nature and will not bother other fish in the tank.

They are also both bottom-dwellers, so they will not compete for space in the aquarium. Goldfish are omnivorous and will eat just about anything, while Hoplo Catfish are mostly carnivorous. It is important to provide both goldfish and Hoplo Catfish with a diet that meets their nutritional needs.

Goldfish need a diet that is high in carbohydrates, while Hoplo Catfish need a diet that is high in protein. Both fish are also sensitive to changes in water conditions, so it is important to keep a close eye on the water quality in the aquarium. Overall, goldfish and Hoplo Catfish are compatible fish that can live peacefully together in the same tank.

4. Pangasius Catfish

Pangasius Catfish is a species of freshwater fish in the family Pangasiidae. The fish is native to the Mekong River basin in Southeast Asia but has been introduced to other rivers in the region. It is also known as the Mekong catfish, striped catfish, or swai.

Pangasius Catfish is a popular food fish in the region and is also exported to other parts of the world. The fish is farmed in ponds and tanks and is also caught in the wild. The fish is known to reach a length of up to 6 ft and a weight of up to 220 lb.

Pangasius Catfish is a bottom-dwelling fish that feeds on plants, small invertebrates, and detritus.

Pangasius Catfish fish

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish (Carassius auratus) and Pangasius catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) are both freshwater fish that are popular in home aquariums. They are both compatible with each other and can live peacefully in the same tank.

Goldfish are a hardy species that can tolerate a wide range of water conditions. They are also relatively low maintenance, which makes them a good choice for beginner fishkeepers. Pangasius catfish are also low maintenance and can tolerate a wide range of water conditions. They are a good choice for beginner fishkeepers who want larger fish in their aquarium.

Pangasius catfish are a peaceful species and will not bother goldfish. They are also bottom-dwelling fish, so they will not compete with goldfish for food.

5. Otocinclus Catfish

Otocinclus Catfish fish, also known as Otoes, is a small, peaceful freshwater fish that make a great addition to any aquarium. These little fish are native to South America and are a member of the Loricariidae family, which contains over 300 different species of suckermouth catfish. Otocinclus Catfish is one of the smallest members of this family, growing to only about 2 inches in length.

One of the most appealing things about Otocinclus Catfish is their unique appearance. These fish have long, slender bodies covered in small, round scales. They are brown or black in color, with a white or cream-colored belly. One of the most distinguishing features of the Otocinclus Catfish is the large suckermouth located on the underside of their head. This mouth allows the fish to attach to rocks and other surfaces in their natural habitat.

Otocinclus Catfish are relatively easy to care for, making them a great choice for beginner aquarium hobbyists. They prefer to live in groups of 5 or more fish, so be sure to purchase a few when adding them to your tank. These fish are not demanding when it comes to water conditions and will do well in a variety of different setups. A well-oxygenated tank with plenty of hiding places is ideal.

Otocinclus Catfish are omnivorous and will consume a variety of different foods. In the wild, these fish feed on algae and other small organisms. In the aquarium, they can be fed a diet of algae wafers and frozen or live foods. Be sure to supplement their diet with vegetables such as zucchini or cucumber to ensure they get all the necessary nutrients.

Otocinclus Catfish

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish and Otocinclus Catfish are both freshwater fish that can live peacefully together in the same tank. Goldfish are a little larger and require more space, but both fish are compatible in terms of temperament and care.

Both fish are peaceful, and Otocinclus Catfish are actually known for being good tankmates for goldfish.

6. Hillstream Butterfly Loach

If you’re looking for a unique and interesting addition to your aquarium, you may want to consider the Hillstream Butterfly Loach. This freshwater fish is native to fast-flowing rivers in Asia, and is adapted to living in a highly oxygenated environment.

The Hillstream Butterfly Loach is a small fish growing to a maximum length of about 3 inches. It has a dark brown or black body, with a white or light-colored stripe running along each side. The fins are transparent, and the tail is forked.

The Hillstream Butterfly Loach is a peaceful fish that gets along well with other aquarium inhabitants. It is an active swimmer and does best in an aquarium with plenty of open space and a strong water current.

The Hillstream Butterfly Loach is an omnivore, and will eat a variety of foods, including freeze-dried and live foods, as well as flakes and pellets.

Hillstream Butterfly

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish and Hillstream Butterfly Loach are compatible pairs because they both enjoy living in fast-moving water. They are also both peaceful fish that won’t bother each other. The only thing to watch out for is that Hillstream Butterfly Loach may eat small goldfish, so it’s best to keep them in a tank with fish that are similar in size.

7. Brochis Multiradiatus

Brochis multiradiatus is a freshwater fish that is native to South America. It is a member of the corydoradinae subfamily of the family callichthyidae. The fish is also known as the multi-spotted Brochis, the many-spotted catfish, and the multi-spot cory.

The Brochis multiradiatus is a small to medium-sized fish that can reach a length of up to 3.1 in. The body of the fish is elongated and flattened from the sides. The fish is covered with small, round scales. The coloration of the fish varies from dark brown to light brown. The belly of the fish is usually lighter in color. The fish has 8-10 dark vertical bars on the body. There are also numerous small spots on the body and fins.

The Brochis multiradiatus is a peaceful fish that is suitable for community aquariums. The fish is a bottom-dweller and prefers to stay close to the substrate. The fish is a good algae-eater and will help to keep the aquarium clean. The Brochis multiradiatus is an omnivorous fish and will accept most types of food. The diet of the fish should include both plant and animal matter.

The Brochis multiradiatus is a shy fish that prefers to stay hidden among the plants and substrates in the aquarium. The fish is a social creature and does best when kept in groups of 5 or more individuals.

Brochis Multiradiatus fish

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish and Brochis Multiradiatus are two species of freshwater fish that can often be found living together peacefully in aquariums. Both of these fish are peaceful by nature and have similar dietary and habitat requirements, which makes them a compatible pairing.

8. Dojo Loach

Dojo loaches are freshwater fish that are popular in the aquarium trade. They are native to East Asia and can be found in China, Japan, and Korea. Dojo loaches are bottom-dwellers and prefer to live in groups.

They are peaceful fish but can be nippy towards each other if they are not kept in a large enough tank. Dojo loaches are nocturnal and will hide during the day. They are omnivorous and will eat most aquarium foods.

Dojo Loach fish

Compatibility with goldfish

Dojo loaches and goldfish are a companions pair. Both species are peaceful and do not bother each other. The dojo loach will help clean the goldfish tank by eating uneaten food and waste. The goldfish will provide the dojo loach with shelter and a place to hide.

9. Giant Danio

Giant Danio is a freshwater fish that is native to South and Southeast Asia. It is a member of the minnow family and can grow to be up to 12 inches long.

The Giant Danio is a popular aquarium fish and is known for being hardy and easy to care for. They are peaceful fish that do well in community tanks and are often used as dither fish to help shy fish come out of their shells.

Giant Danios are omnivorous and will eat a variety of foods but prefer live or frozen foods.

Giant Danio fish

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish and Giant Danio are two different types of fish that can live together in the same tank. Goldfish are coldwater fish, while Giant Danio is tropical fish. Although they come from different climates, these two fish can live together peacefully in the same aquarium.

10. Zebra Danio

Zebra Danios are small freshwater fish that is native to South and Southeast Asia. They are one of the most popular aquarium fish due to their small size, low maintenance, and lively personality.

Zebra Danios are easily recognizable by their black and white stripes, which run horizontally along their bodies. These fish are very active and are known to be good jumpers, so it is important to have a secure lid on your aquarium.

Zebra Danios are schooling fish, so they should be kept in groups of at least six. They are peaceful fish that do well with other small, peaceful fish. Zebra Danios are omnivores and will eat a variety of foods, including flakes, pellets, live, and frozen foods.

Zebra Danio fish

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish and Zebra Danios are compatible because they are both cold water fish. They can live together in the same tank and will not fight with each other. They have different diets, so it is important to feed them separately. Goldfish are bottom feeders, and Zebra Danios are top feeders.

11. White Cloud Mountain Minnow

The White Cloud Mountain minnow is a freshwater fish native to China. It is a member of the carp family and is closely related to the common goldfish. The White Cloud Mountain minnow is a popular aquarium fish and is often kept as a pet.

The White Cloud Mountain minnow is a small fish growing to a maximum length of 3 inches. The body is silver-grey in color, with a black stripe running along the back. The fins are red or orange.

The White Cloud Mountain minnow is a peaceful fish and can be kept with other peaceful fish species. It is an active swimmer and does best in an aquarium with plenty of open space to swim. A group of White Cloud Mountain minnows is a beautiful sight in an aquarium.

White Cloud Mountain Minnow fish

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish and White Cloud Mountain Minnows can be compatible tank mates. They are both peaceful fish that will not bother each other. Goldfish are cold-water fish, and White Cloud Mountain Minnows are tropical fish, so they can live in the same tank as long as the tank is big enough and has a heater to keep the water warm enough for the White Cloud Mountain Minnows.

12. Golden Mountain Minnow (Tanichthys Albonubes)

Golden Mountain Minnow is a freshwater fish species native to southern Thailand. It is a member of the carp family and is related to the common minnow.

The Golden Mountain Minnow is found in slow-moving streams and lakes with muddy bottoms. It feeds on small insects, crustaceans, and mollusks.

Tanichthys Albonubes

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish and Golden Mountain Minnows are two very different species of fish, but they can actually be quite compatible with each other.

One potential issue with keeping these two fish together is that the goldfish may eat the minnows. This is more likely to happen if the goldfish are much larger than the minnows. If you are concerned about this, you can provide hiding places for the minnows or feed the goldfish separately.

Overall, goldfish and Golden Mountain Minnows can make good tank mates. They have different preferences, but they can coexist peacefully.

13. Checkered Barb (Puntius Oligolepis)

The Checkered Barb is a species of freshwater fish in the Cyprinidae family. It is native to Southeast Asia and is found in the Mekong and Chao Phraya basins. It prefers habitats with slow-moving water and can be found in both ponds and rivers.

This species can grow to a length of 4.7 in and is brown or black in color with a checkerboard pattern on its body. Its diet consists of small invertebrates and algae. The Checkered Barb is an important food fish in its native range and is also kept as an aquarium fish.

Puntius Oligolepis

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish and Checkered Barb are a great match! They both enjoy plant life and being in close proximity to one another. Goldfish are known to be very social creatures, so the Checkered Barb will definitely keep them company. These two species are also compatible in size, which is important when considering tank mates.

14. Rosy Barb (Puntius Conchonius)

Rosy Barb (Puntius conchonius) is a tropical freshwater fish belonging to the Barb family. It is native to South Asia, but has been introduced to many other parts of the world. The Rosy Barb is a popular aquarium fish, and is also used in traditional medicine.

The Rosy Barb is a small fish, growing to a maximum length of around 2.4 in. It is pink or orange in color, with a dark stripe running along the length of the body. The back and sides are covered in small black spots. The fins are red or orange.

The Rosy Barb is a peaceful fish, and can be kept in a community aquarium with other peaceful species. It is an omnivorous species, and will eat most types of aquarium food, including live, frozen, and flake foods.

Rosy Barb

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish and Rosy Barb are a great compatibility! They are both hardy fish that can withstand a wide range of water conditions. They are also both peaceful fish that will not bother each other. The only thing to watch out for is that Rosy Barb can be a bit nippy, so it is important to keep an eye on them and make sure they are not bothering the goldfish too much.

15. Longfin Rosy Barb

The Longfin Rosy Barb is a peaceful and hardy fish that is well suited for the beginner aquarium. It is a popular choice for community tanks because it is not aggressive and gets along well with other fish.

The Longfin Rosy Barb is a beautiful fish with a reddish body and long fins. It is a relatively small fish, only reaching about four inches in length.

Longfin Rosy Barb fish

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish and Longfin Rosy Barb are both compatible with each other. They can both live in the same tank and will not bother each other. They are both peaceful fish that will get along well together.

16. Ricefish

Ricefish is a small, freshwater fish native to East Asia. They are a popular food fish in Japan, China, and Korea, and are also kept as pets. Ricefish are easy to care for and a great choice for beginner fish keepers.

Ricefish is a member of the carp family and can grow to be around 4 inches long. They are silver in color, with a dark stripe running down their backs. Ricefish are peaceful fish, and do well when kept with other peaceful species. They are not known to be fin nippers.

Ricefish are omnivorous and will eat a variety of foods, including pellets, flakes, live and frozen foods. They should be given a variety of foods to keep them healthy.

Ricefish are easy to breed and will often do so in a community tank. The fry (baby fish) are very small and need to be fed baby brine shrimp or other small live foods.

Ricefish fish

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish and Ricefish are two very different kinds of fish, but they can actually be quite compatible. Both goldfish and Ricefish are freshwater fish, so they can live in the same tank. Goldfish are generally larger and more active than Ricefish, so they may need a little more space to swim around. Ricefish are also known to be a little more delicate than goldfish, so it’s important to make sure that the water conditions in their tank are ideal.

Overall, goldfish and Ricefish can make good tank mates. They have different temperaments and care needs, but as long as their tank is big enough and the water conditions are good, they should be able to live together peacefully.

17. Variatus Platy

The Variatus Platy is a peaceful community fish that does well in most aquariums. They are a small fish, only growing to be about two and a half inches long. The Platy is a live-bearer, which means that they give birth to live young rather than laying eggs. The female Platy will usually have about ten young at a time.

The Platy is a hardy fish and can tolerate a wide range of water conditions. They are a good choice for beginner aquarium enthusiasts.

Platies are active fish and will do well in a tank with other community fish. They are not aggressive and will not bother other fish in the tank.

The Platy is a omnivore and will eat most aquarium foods. They should have a diet that consists of both plant and animal matter. A good quality flake food or pellet food will provide the Platy with the nutrients they need. They also like to nibble on algae in the tank.

Variatus Platy

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish and Variatus Platy are two popular freshwater fish that can often be found in the same tank. While these fish are compatible with each other, there are a few things to keep in mind in order to ensure a healthy environment for both species.

Goldfish are known to be messy eaters and can often uproot plants in the tank in their search for food. This can be detrimental to the delicate Variatus Platy, who rely on plants for shelter and protection. It is important to provide plenty of plants and hiding places for the Platy and to keep an eye on the goldfish to make sure they are not causing too much destruction.

Another thing to consider is the different water needs of these fish. Goldfish are coldwater fish and prefer water that is on the cooler side, while Platy are tropical fish and prefer water that is a bit warmer. It is important to maintain the proper temperature for both species and to have a good filtration system in place to keep the water quality high.

18. Black Molly

Molly fish are a species of freshwater fish that are popular in aquariums. They are native to Central America and the southern United States. Molly fish are relatively easy to care for and are known for their peaceful nature.

Molly fish come in a variety of colors, including black. Black molly fish are popular for aquariums because of their striking color. They are also known for being hardy and easy to care for.

Molly fish are omnivorous and will eat a variety of foods, including flakes, pellets, and live foods. They should be fed a variety of foods to ensure proper nutrition.

Molly fish are social creatures and do best when kept in groups. They should be kept with other peaceful fish species.

Black Molly fish

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish and Black Molly can be great compatible tank mates. They both do best in a tank with a sandy substrate and plenty of hiding places. Goldfish are peaceful fish that will not bother the Black Molly. The Black Molly may chase the goldfish around, but this is usually harmless. Both of these fish enjoy eating algae, so having them in the same tank can help keep it clean.

19. Bristlenose Pleco

There are many different types of plecos, and the Bristlenose pleco is just one of them. This fish is a freshwater fish that originates from the Amazon River Basin. The Bristlenose pleco gets its name from the fact that it has bristles on its nose.

This fish is a scavenger, and it will eat just about anything. The Bristlenose pleco is a nocturnal fish, and it prefers to hide during the daytime. This fish is brown or tan in color and has black spots all over its body. The Bristlenose pleco can grow to be about 6 inches long.

Bristlenose Pleco

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish are compatible with Bristlenose Plecos because they are both peaceful fish that do well in community tanks. Goldfish and Bristlenose Plecos prefer to live in water between 70 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

They both also prefer to live in tanks with plenty of hiding places. Goldfish and Bristlenose Plecos are both omnivorous, so they will eat most types of aquarium foods.

20. Harlequin Rasbora

Harlequin Rasbora (Trigonostigma heteromorpha) is a small, colorful freshwater fish that is popular in the aquarium trade. The fish is native to Southeast Asia and is found in Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia. It is a member of the Cyprinidae family, which includes carp and minnows. The fish grows to a maximum length of 2.5 inches.

The body of the harlequin rasbora is oval-shaped and compressed. The fish is covered with large, shining scales. The coloration of the fish is variable, but most individuals are bright red with a black triangle on the caudal peduncle (the area of the body just before the tail fin). The fins are red or orange.

The harlequin rasbora is a peaceful fish that does well in a community aquarium. It is an active swimmer and prefers to school with other fish. The fish is an omnivore and will eat most types of aquarium foods, including flakes, pellets, and live foods.

Harlequin Rasbora fish

Compatibility with goldfish

When it comes to compatibility, goldfish and Harlequin Rasbora are a match made in heaven! Both species are incredibly peaceful, making them the perfect candidates for a community tank. In addition, both goldfish and Rasboras are known to be hardy fish, so they can withstand a wide range of water conditions.

When setting up a tank for goldfish and Rasboras, it is important to provide plenty of hiding spots and open swimming space. Goldfish are notorious for their large appetites, so a well-stocked tank is a must. Rasboras are also relatively active fish, so they will appreciate a tank with plenty of room to swim.

21. Banded Corydoras

Corydoras is a popular freshwater fish in the aquarium trade. They are peaceful, schooling fish that are easy to care for. One of the most popular species is the Banded Corydoras (Corydoras barthi).

Banded Corydoras are native to South America and are found in slow-moving waters. They have a black vertical stripe that runs down the length of their body. This stripe is bordered by a thin, white line. Their fins are transparent, and they have black spots on their head.

Banded Corydoras are peaceful fish that do well in community tanks. They should be kept in groups of at least 5-6 fish. They are bottom-dwellers and prefer to swim in the middle or lower levels of the tank.

Banded Corydoras are omnivorous and will eat a variety of foods. They should be fed a diet of freeze-dried foods, pellets, and flake foods. They will also eat live foods such as brine shrimp and bloodworms.

Corydoras barthi

Compatibility with goldfish

Goldfish and Banded Corydoras are two different types of fish that can be kept together in the same tank. Goldfish are a type of carp and are cold water fish. Banded Corydoras are a type of catfish and are tropical fish.

When choosing a tank for these two types of fish, it is important to make sure that the tank is large enough to accommodate both fish. The tank should also have a filter to keep the water clean and a heater to keep the water at a temperature that is suitable for both fish.

22. Albino Corydoras

There are many things that make the Albino Corydoras (Corydoras aeneus) a special and interesting fish. For starters, they are one of the only albino fish that is widely available in the aquarium trade. They are also a very peaceful and hardy fish, making them a great addition to any community aquarium.

The Albino Corydoras is a beautiful fish with a pale white body and orange-red fins. They grow to a maximum length of about 3 inches.

Corydoras aeneus

Compatibility with goldfish

Albino Corydoras are compatible fishes with goldfish that can be kept together in the same tank. Albino Corydoras are small, peaceful fish that will scavenge the bottom of the tank for food, and they will not bother the goldfish. Goldfish are large, active fish that will need plenty of room to swim and a diet that includes both live and frozen food.

FAQs on The Best Compatible Fishes With Goldfish

Do Goldfish Get Lonely?

Goldfish do not typically get lonely, as they are social fish that enjoy the company of other goldfish. However, if there is a lack of other fish in the tank, the goldfish may become lonely.

Do Goldfish Eat Guppies?

Goldfish will eat guppies, but keeping them together in the same tank is not recommended. Guppies are much smaller than goldfish and can easily be eaten by them. If you do decide to keep them together, make sure you have a lot of plants and hiding places for the guppies.

Can Goldfish Live With Betta?

If you want to keep goldfish with a betta, you need to have a very large tank. These fish are not compatible and will fight each other if they are in the same tank.

Can I Put Tetra With Goldfish?

Tetra and goldfish are both freshwater fish, so they can live together in the same tank. However, goldfish are much larger than tetra and have a different diet, so you will need to take care when feeding them and ensure that the goldfish do not eat all the food.

Can I Put Shrimp in With My Goldfish?

You shouldn’t put shrimp in with goldfish because shrimp are a lot smaller than goldfish and can easily become a meal for larger fish.

Also read:

Conclusion

Goldfish are a popular aquarium fish, and many different types of aquarium partners can be kept with them. Some of the most popular are other types of fish, but many different types of plants can be used.

References:

  • Juvenile fish – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juvenile_fish
  • Minnow Family – http://www2.dnr.cornell.edu/cek7/nyfish/Cyprinidae/cyprinidae.html

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