Blue Bolt Shrimp (Caridina cantonensis var. “Blue Bolt”) Care Guide: Lifespan, Nutrition and Create Healthy Environment

If you’re looking for a unique and eye-catching addition to your aquarium, then blue bolt shrimp may be a perfect choice! These beautiful shrimp are relatively new to the aquarium trade, but they’re already becoming …

Blue Bolt shrimp in the tank

If you’re looking for a unique and eye-catching addition to your aquarium, then blue bolt shrimp may be a perfect choice! These beautiful shrimp are relatively new to the aquarium trade, but they’re already becoming a popular choice among shrimp keepers.

Blue bolt shrimp are native to Thailand and are members of the Atyidae family, which includes other popular aquarium shrimp such as the bamboo shrimp and the crystal red shrimp. They get their name from their electric blue coloration, which is accented by orange and white stripes.

Despite their stunning appearance, blue bolt shrimp are actually quite peaceful and make good tank mates for other shrimp and small fish. They are omnivorous and will eat a variety of foods, including algae, detritus, and small pellets.

One thing to keep in mind is that blue bolt shrimp are relatively delicate, so they require clean water and regular water changes. They are also sensitive to chemicals and medications, so it’s important to use caution when adding anything to their tank.

Are Blue Bolt Shrimp Hard to Keep?
Blue bolt shrimp are relatively easy to keep, but there are a few things to keep in mind to ensure their health and well-being. One of the most important things to keep in mind when keeping blue bolt shrimp is that they are sensitive to water quality. It is important to maintain a clean and stable environment for them to thrive.

Species Summary

Name:Blue Bolt Shrimp
Other names:Blue Bolt, BB, Bolt Shrimp, Blue Caridina, Taiwan Bee
Scientific name:Caridina Catonensis sp. Blue Bolt
Temperament:Peaceful
Life span:1–2 years
Color form:Blue to white coloration
Size:~1-2 inches

Where do They Come From?

The blue bolt shrimp is a species of shrimp that is native to the Indian and Pacific Ocean regions. It is a popular aquarium shrimp and is also used in the aquarium trade.

How Long do Blue Bolt Shrimp Live for?

Blue bolt shrimp are relatively easy to care for and can live for 1-2 years with proper care.

How Big do Blue Bolt Shrimp Grow?

If you’re looking for a shrimp that grows big, the Blue Bolt shrimp is a great choice. This variety of shrimp can get quite large, making it perfect for those who want to add some serious size to their shrimp population.

As far as size goes, Blue Bolt shrimp can get quite large. In the wild, these shrimp can reach lengths of up to 4 inches. However, in captivity, they’re usually a bit smaller, with most adults only reaching about 2 inches.

Blue Bolt in the aquarium

Blue Bolt Shrimp Anatomy, Appearance, & Varieties

The blue caridina shrimp is a beautiful and unique creature that is found in the tropical waters of the Indo-Pacific. It is easily distinguished by its bright blue coloration and long, slender body. Although it is often called a shrimp, the blue bolt shrimp is actually a member of the Cleaner Shrimp family. These shrimp are important members of the reef community, as they help to keep other fish clean by eating parasites and dead skin. The blue bolt shrimp is a relatively small creature, reaching a maximum length of only about 2 inches.

The body of the blue bolt shrimp is divided into two main sections: the cephalothorax and the abdomen. The cephalothorax is the fused head and thorax region, and it is covered by a hard exoskeleton. This exoskeleton is composed of chitin, a substance that is also found in the shells of crabs and lobsters. The cephalothorax houses the shrimp’s two main sensory organs, the eyes, and antennules. The shrimp’s eyes are located on the top of the head, and they are capable of seeing both near and far. The antennules are located on the sides of the head, and they are used for sensing touch, taste, and smell.

The abdomen is the posterior region of the shrimp’s body, and it is composed of 11 segments. The first segment of the abdomen is fused to the cephalothorax, and the remaining 10 segments are each protected by a hard shell. The shrimp’s tail is located on the final segment of the abdomen, and it is used for propulsion. The shrimp’s two main pairs of legs are located on the first and second segments of the abdomen. These legs are used for walking and for cleaning other fish. The shrimp’s two main claws are located on the third and fourth segments of the abdomen. These claws are used for defense and for catching food.

How Much do Blue Bolt Shrimp Cost?

While Blue Bolt shrimp are not the cheapest shrimp on the market, they are still very affordable and can be purchased for around $3 each. This price can vary depending on the supplier, so it is always best to shop around to find the best deal.

Blue Bolt Shrimp Key Care Stats

Tank size (optimal):10 gallons (~40 liters)
Keeping:Medium
Breeding:Medium (a high order shrimp)
Optimal temperature:20–22 °C (68–72 °F)
Optimal pH:6.0–6.8
Optimal GH:3–6
Optimal KH:0–2
Optimal TDS:120 –150
Nitrate:Less than 20 ppm
Diet:Algae eater/omnivore

Blue Bolt Shrimp Care & Tank Requirements

Below you will learn how to properly prepare the aquarium for the appearance of shrimp.

The Best Aquarium Size for Blue Bolt Shrimps

When it comes to choosing the best aquarium size for Blue Bolt Shrimp, there are a few things to keep in mind.

First, Blue Bolt Shrimp are social creatures and do best in groups. A minimum of six shrimp is recommended, but more is even better. This means you’ll need an aquarium that is at least 10 gallons in size.

Second, Blue Bolt Shrimp are known to be jumpers. They are attracted to light and may jump out of the aquarium if given the opportunity. To prevent this, it’s important to have a tight-fitting lid on your aquarium.

Finally, Blue Bolt Shrimp are sensitive to water quality. They do best in well-oxygenated, clean water with a neutral pH. A filter is a must, and regular water changes are essential.

Blue Bolt in the aquarium

Water Parameters

While Blue Bolt Shrimp are not overly difficult to care for, they do have some specific requirements that must be met in order to keep them healthy. Perhaps the most important of these is the water parameters. Blue Bolt Shrimp are very sensitive to changes in water quality, so it is important to maintain stable conditions.

The ideal water parameters for Blue Bolt Shrimp are as follows:

Tank Water Temperature: 20 – 22 °C (68 – 72 °F)
Aquarium pH: 6.0 – 6.8
Optimal GH: 3 – 6
Optimal KH: 0 – 2

As you can see, Blue Bolt Shrimp prefer relatively neutral water that is on the warm side. They are also very sensitive to ammonia and nitrites, so it is important to make sure that these levels are always at zero. Nitrates should also be kept as low as possible.

If you are able to maintain these water parameters, your Blue Bolt Shrimp will be healthy and happy. Not overly difficult to blue bolt shrimp care for, but they do require some special attention in order to thrive.

Filtration

There are a few different types of filtration that can be used for Blue Bolt shrimp. The most common and recommended type of filtration is canister filtration. Canister filters are very efficient at removing small particles from the water and they also provide a good amount of water movement, which is important for the health of shrimp.

Another type of filtration that can be used is a sponge filter. Sponge filters are not as efficient at removing small particles from the water but they are much easier to set up and maintain.

Whichever type of filtration you choose, it is important to make sure that the filter is properly maintained. This means cleaning the filter media on a regular basis and making sure that the water flow is not too strong for the shrimp.

Blue Bolt in the aquarium

Do Blue Bolt Shrimp Need Air Pump?

This is a question that shrimp keepers often ask, and the answer is not as simple as a yes or no. In short, Blue Bolt shrimp do not *need* an air pump, but they will certainly benefit from one.

Shrimp are very sensitive to water quality and parameters, and even a slight change can cause them stress. An air pump will help to keep the water moving and aerated, which will help to keep the shrimp healthy and reduce stress levels.

In addition, an air pump can also help to prevent stagnation and anaerobic conditions in the tank, which can lead to the build-up of harmful toxins.

So, while Blue Bolt shrimp do not *need* an air pump, we would highly recommend using one to help keep your shrimp healthy and happy.

Aquarium Lighting

In the wild, blue bolt shrimp lives in shallow, clear waters where they get plenty of sunlight. So, in your aquarium, you’ll need to provide them with bright lighting that closely mimics natural sunlight.

You might be tempted to use a standard aquarium light, but this could actually be harmful to your shrimp. Blue bolt shrimp are very sensitive to light, and the strong glare from a standard aquarium light can cause them stress and even harm their eyesight.

Instead, look for an aquarium light that has a lower intensity and a softer glow. This will provide your shrimp with the bright light they need without causing them any stress or discomfort.

Blue Bolt in an aquarium

Plants and Decorations

If you’re looking for the best plants and decorations to make your blue shrimp pet aquarium look amazing, you’ve come to the right place! Here are our top picks:

  1. Anubias barteri – This plant is perfect for shrimp tanks because it doesn’t need much light or nutrients to thrive.
  2. Bucephalandra – Another great plant for shrimp tanks, bucephalandra comes in a variety of colors and sizes to add interest to your aquarium.
  3. Cryptocoryne wendtii – This plant is a great addition to any shrimp tank because it helps to oxygenate the water and provides hiding places for your shrimp.
  4. Java moss – it doesn’t need much light or nutrients to thrive. It’s also a great plant for breeding shrimp because it provides hiding places for the baby shrimp.
  5. Marimo moss balls – they help to oxygenate the water and provide hiding places for your shrimp. They’re also a lot of fun to watch as they roll around in the current!
  6. Water sprite – it helps to oxygenate the water and provides hiding places for your shrimp. It’s also a fast-growing plant, so it can help to keep your tank clean by absorbing excess nutrients from the water.
  7. Driftwood – Driftwood is a great addition to any shrimp tank because it provides hiding places for your shrimp and helps to create a more natural-looking environment. It can also be used to help anchor plants in place.
  8. Stones and gravel – Stones and gravel can be used to create interesting aquascapes in your shrimp tank. They can also help to anchor plants in place.
  9. Tank backgrounds – Tank backgrounds are a great way to add interest to your shrimp tank and can help to create a more natural-looking environment.

What’s the Best Substrate for Blue Bolt Shrimps?

If you’re looking to keep Blue Bolt Shrimps, it’s important to know what the best substrate is for them. In their natural habitat, these shrimp live in areas with a sandy substrate. This is because the sand helps to keep their food source (algae) from getting swept away in the currents.

In the aquarium, you can use a variety of substrates, but sand is still the best option. Blue Bolt Shrimps are known to be very sensitive to chemicals, so it’s important to use a type of sand that is chemical-free. There are many types of “reef-safe” sand available at your local fish store.

Another option is to use a substrate that contains live plants. This will provide the shrimp with a place to hide and forage for food. Just be sure to use plants that are also safe for shrimp. Some good options include java moss, anubias, and crypts.

No matter what type of substrate you choose, it’s important to keep it clean.

Blue Bolt in an aquarium

Food & Diet

It is also important to choose the right diet for shrimp. Read below how to do this:

What Can I Feed Blue Bolt Shrimp?

Blue Bolt shrimp are a type of dwarf shrimp that are popular in the aquarium trade. They are native to Southeast Asia and are found in Thailand, Malaysia, and Singapore. Blue Bolt shrimp are relatively easy to care for and make a great addition to any freshwater aquarium.

One of the most important things to consider when keeping Blue Bolt shrimp is their diet. In the wild, these shrimp are omnivorous and will eat a variety of different foods. In the aquarium, it is important to provide them with a diet that is nutritious and will help them to thrive.

There are a variety of different foods that can be given to Blue Bolt shrimp. They will accept most types of frozen or live foods, as well as pellet and flake foods. To ensure that your shrimp are getting a varied and nutritious diet, it is best to feed them a mix of different foods.

Some good options for frozen or live foods include brine shrimp, daphnia, and bloodworms. These foods should be offered a few times a week and can be supplemented with pellet or flake food. It is also a good idea to offer some vegetables to your shrimp.

Vegetables such as zucchini, cucumber, and spinach are all good choices. These can be offered daily, either blanched or as part of a veggie wafer. By offering a variety of different foods, you will ensure that your Blue Bolt shrimp are getting all the nutrients they need to stay healthy and happy.

Blue Bolt in the tank

How Often Do Blue Bolt Shrimp Need to Be Fed?

It is a good idea to feed Blue Bolt shrimp 2-3 times a day. This will ensure that they are getting enough food and that their tank does not become polluted.

How Long Can a Blue Bolt Shrimp Go Without Food?

A Blue Bolt shrimp can go without food for up to two weeks. However, if the shrimp is placed in an environment with no food, it will eventually die.

Watch the Following Video on Blue Bolt Shrimp Care Guide

Behavior & Temperament

Blue bolt shrimp are relatively peaceful and can be kept with other peaceful fish species. However, they are also known to be somewhat shy and may hide if there are too many fish in the tank.

Good Tank Mates

Some good tank mates for blue bolt shrimp include:

Shrimp:

  • Crystal shrimp
  • Bee shrimp
  • Bamboo shrimp
  • Caridina cf. babaulti
  • Tangerine Tiger shrimp

Snails:

  • Japanese trapdoor snails
  • Ramshorn snails
  • Nerite snails
  • Malaysian Trumpet snails
  • Black Devil snails

Unsafe Tank Mates

One of the most common aquarium mates that is unsafe for blue bolt shrimp is the betta fish. These fish are aggressive and can easily outcompete the shrimp for food. They can also attack and kill the shrimp.

Another common aquarium mate that is unsafe for blue bolt shrimp is the goldfish. Like bettas, goldfish are also aggressive and can outcompete the shrimp for food.

Finally, another common aquarium mate that is unsafe for blue bolt shrimp is the eel. Eels are predators and can easily eat shrimp.

If you’re looking to keep blue bolt shrimp, it’s important to avoid these unsafe aquarium mates. Stick with other peaceful and gentle fish that won’t pose a threat to the shrimp.

Blue Bolt in the tank

Blue Bolt Shrimp Breeding

Blue Bolt shrimp are relatively easy to breed, and they make good parents. The fry is also easy to care for and grows quickly.

When breeding Blue Bolt shrimp, it is best to use a group of 6 or more. This will help ensure that there is enough genetic diversity among the offspring. The shrimp should be of similar size and age, and they should be well-fed.

The breeding process begins with the male shrimp chasing the females around. Once he catches one, he will grab her by the back of the head with his claws and pull her towards him. He will then release her and the two will swim away.

After a few days, the female will start to release her eggs. The male will then fertilize them. The eggs will be attached to the female’s abdomen, and she will carry them until they hatch.

The fry will be born alive and should be able to swim on its own. They will be very small, but they will grow quickly. The fry should be fed a diet of baby brine shrimp or other small live foods.

As they grow, the fry will start to develop their blue coloration. Once they reach adulthood, they will be ready to breed themselves.

Blue Bolt in the tank

FAQs on How to Care for Blue Bolt shrimp

How many Blue Bolt shrimp can I put in a 10-gallon tank?

A general rule of thumb is one inch of fish per gallon, so 10 Blue Bolt shrimp could be housed in a 10-gallon tank.

What’s the easiest shrimp to keep?

There is no definitive answer to this question as different shrimp species have different care requirements. Some shrimp are more difficult to keep than others, and some shrimp are more sensitive to changes in water quality and temperature than others. If you are new to keeping shrimp, it is best to start with a species that is relatively easy to care for, such as cherry shrimp or Amano shrimp.

What is the hardiest shrimp?

There is no definitive answer to this question as different shrimp species have different levels of hardiness. Some shrimp are more resistant to disease and can tolerate more adverse conditions than others. Some of the hardiest shrimp include the Cherry Shrimp, the Crystal Red Shrimp, and the Ghost Shrimp.

Will Blue Bolt shrimp breed with Crystal Red shrimp?

It is generally believed that Blue Bolt shrimp are not likely to breed with Crystal Red shrimp due to their different genetic makeup.

How often should I do a water change in my shrimp tank?

It is typically recommended to do a water change in a shrimp tank once a week.

Closing Thoughts

If you’re looking for a striking addition to your aquarium, the blue bolt shrimp is a great option.

Overall, in their natural habitat, blue bolt shrimp are scavengers that feed on detritus and small invertebrates. In the aquarium, they should be fed a variety of foods, including brine shrimp, bloodworms, and sinking pellets or tablets. It’s important to provide them with a variety of foods to ensure they get the nutrients they need.

Blue bolt shrimp are social creatures and do best in groups of at least six. They prefer to hide among plants and rocks, so be sure to include plenty of hiding places in your aquarium.

If you provide your blue bolt shrimp with the proper care, they will thrive in your aquarium and provide you with hours of enjoyment.

References:

  • Cephalothorax (Wikipedia): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cephalothorax
  • Aquarium Water Quality: Nitrogen Cycle (Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services): https://www.fdacs.gov/Consumer-Resources/Recreation-and-Leisure/Aquarium-Fish/Aquarium-Water-Quality-Nitrogen-Cycle
  • Bloodworm (Britannica): https://www.britannica.com/animal/bloodworm-annelid

1 thought on “Blue Bolt Shrimp (Caridina cantonensis var. “Blue Bolt”) Care Guide: Lifespan, Nutrition and Create Healthy Environment”

  1. Today was in a pet store and there were on sale blue shrimp, I wanted to buy a couple or more, but then I decided that first it is better that something about them know. On the Internet that something about them quite a little information, maybe someone had them to keep? What kind of shrimp? How big they grow? What do they eat well, or by whom? Can they breed in the aquarium? And then I found your article – it’s great! I would love to learn more about this species. They are so beautiful.

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