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Blue Velvet Shrimp (Neocaridina davidi var. “Blue”) Care Guide: Lifespan, Nutrition and Create Healthy Environment

Velvety Blue Shrimp is a beautiful, unique-looking shrimp that will surely stand out in any freshwater aquarium. They are native to Thailand and are a peaceful community of fish. Velvety Blue Shrimp are known to …

Blue Velvet in the aquarium

Velvety Blue Shrimp is a beautiful, unique-looking shrimp that will surely stand out in any freshwater aquarium. They are native to Thailand and are a peaceful community of fish. Velvety Blue Shrimp are known to be very active and make great additions to any shrimp-only tank or a nano aquarium. They are very easy to care for as long as some basic guidelines are followed.

The blueberry shrimp is a very beautiful shrimp that is blue with darker blue stripes running along its body. The Velvety Blue Shrimp is a very peaceful community fish and is known to be very active.

In the wild, Velvety Blue Shrimp live in slow-moving waters with plenty of vegetation. In the aquarium, they should be provided with plenty of hiding places and plenty of vegetation. They are not picky eaters and will accept most sinking pellets and frozen foods. They are also known to be very active and will often be seen grazing on algae in the aquarium.

Velvety Blue Shrimp are very easy to breed in the aquarium. They are known to be very good parents and will often take care of their young. They are not known to be aggressive towards their young or other tank mates.

Are Blue Velvet Shrimp Easy to Care for?
Blue velvet shrimp are not demanding and will do well in a wide range of water parameters. They are also not particular about food and will accept most aquarium fare. However, like all shrimp, they are very sensitive to water quality and changes in water parameters. As such, it is important to maintain a stable environment in their tank.

Blue Velvet Shrimp Key Care Stats

Tank size:5–10 gallons (about 40 liters)
Temperature:72°–82 °F (22–28 °C)
pH:6.4–8.0 (ideally 6.8–7.5)
KH:0-8 (ideally 2–4)
GH:4-14 (ideally 6–8)
TDS:100-400 (ideally 150–200)
Nitrate:Less than 20 ppm
Living zone:Bottom-dwellers
Temperament:Peaceful
Diet:Algae eater/omnivore

Species Summary

Scientific name:Neocaridina davidi (formerly Neocaridina heteropoda)
Common names:Blue Velvet shrimp, Blue Jelly shrimp, Blue shrimp
Genus:Neocaridina
Family:Atyidae

Where do They Come From?

In the early 1990s, a new type of shrimp called the blue velvet shrimp emerged in the aquarium trade. These shrimp were a beautiful blue color and quickly became a popular addition to many aquariums. It is believed that the blue velvet shrimp is a hybrid of two other shrimp species, the blue tiger shrimp and the blue diamond shrimp. Blue velvet shrimp is not found in the wild and is only found in aquariums.

How Long do Blue Velvet Shrimp Live for?

These blue cherry shrimp are not known for their long lifespan, however, and typically only live for 1-2 years. This is due to their small size and delicate nature. Blue velvet shrimp are also susceptible to disease and parasites, which can shorten their lifespan even further.

How Big do Blue Velvet Shrimp Grow?

The Blue Velvet Shrimp are relatively small, only growing to be about 1-2 inches in length. However, despite their small size, they are still a hearty and hardy species that can live for several years.

Blue Velvet in an aquarium

Blue Velvet Shrimp Anatomy, Appearance, & Varieties

Blue velvet shrimp are a beautiful and popular addition to many aquariums. They are relatively small, only growing to about 2 inches in length, and have a striking blue coloration that many find very attractive.

As with all shrimp, they have a very simple anatomy. They have a hard, exoskeleton that protects their delicate inner organs. This exoskeleton is shed periodically as they grow, and it must molt in order to continue to grow. They have two large compound eyes that are excellent at detecting movement, and they also have two long antennae that they use to feel their way around.

Underneath their hard exoskeleton, they have very soft and delicate bodies. Their abdomen is very thin and their thorax is very small. This makes them very fragile and susceptible to injury. They have five pairs of legs, with the first pair being modified into large claws that they use for defense and for catching food.

There are many different types of blue aquarium shrimp, all with their own unique colors and patterns. Some common varieties include the electric blue shrimp, royal blue shrimp, and blue tiger shrimp. These beautiful creatures are popular among aquarium hobbyists for their vibrant colors and interesting patterns.

Electric blue shrimp is one of the most popular types of blue velvet shrimp. They are bright blue all over their bodies, with no other colors or patterns. They are relatively small, only reaching about 2 inches in length when fully grown. Electric blue shrimp is also known for being very active and playful, making them a fun addition to any aquarium.

Royal blue shrimp are another popular variety of blue velvet shrimp. They are similar in size to electric blue shrimp but have a much darker blue coloration. Royal blue shrimp also have white spots on their bodies, which gives them a unique look. Like electric blue shrimp, royal blue shrimp are also very active and make great additions to any aquarium.

Blue tiger shrimp is one of the largest varieties of blue velvet shrimp. They can reach up to 4 inches in length when fully grown. Blue tiger shrimp has dark blue body with white stripes running down their backs. These shrimp are also known for being very active, making them great aquarium pets.

Blue Velvet in an aquarium

How Much do Blue Velvet Shrimp Cost?

If you’ve ever wanted to add a little something extra to your aquarium, blue freshwater shrimp may be the way to go. These beautiful creatures are not only unique in color, but they are also relatively low maintenance and can add a bit of fun and excitement to your underwater world. Best of all, they’re not too expensive, with most retailing for around $3-$20 per shrimp.

While they are not necessarily the most low-cost option when it comes to stocking your aquarium, blue velvet shrimp are still a relatively affordable option and can make a great addition to any tank.

Blue Velvet Shrimp Care & Tank Requirements

Below you can learn in detail about the proper care of shrimp and how to properly prepare the aquarium before settling them.

The Best Aquarium Size for Neocaridina Davidi

As a general rule of thumb, blue velvet shrimp should be kept in an aquarium that is at least 10 gallons in size. This will give them enough room to swim and explore, while still providing them with a sense of security. In a larger aquarium, blue velvet shrimp may become stressed and may not display their natural behaviors.

When choosing an aquarium size for blue velvet shrimp, it is also important to consider the other inhabitants of the tank. If you are keeping blue velvet shrimp with other fish, it is important to choose an aquarium size that will accommodate the adult size of all the fish. If you are keeping blue velvet shrimp with other invertebrates, such as snails or crabs, it is important to choose an aquarium size that will accommodate the adult size of the invertebrates.

Blue Velvet in an aquarium

Water Parameters

Temperature: 72–82 °F (22–28 °C)
pH: 6.4–8.0 (ideally from 6.8–7.5)
KH: 0–8 (ideally from 2 to 4)
GH: 4–14 (ideally from 6 to 8)
TDS: 100–400 (ideally from 150 to 200)
Nitrate: less than 20 ppm

Water parameters are extremely important for blue velvet shrimp. They are very sensitive to changes in water quality and can easily succumb to disease if water conditions are not ideal. Maintaining the correct water parameters is essential for keeping blue velvet shrimp healthy and happy.

The ideal temperature for blue neocaridina shrimp is 72-82 degrees Fahrenheit. It is best to use a heater to maintain a consistent temperature in the tank.

The pH level for blue velvet shrimp should be 6.4-8.0. They are relatively tolerant of a range of 6.0-8.0, but prefer slightly acidic water. If the pH level gets too low, it can be stressful for them and cause them to stop eating. If the pH level gets too high, it can cause them to develop shell problems.

Ammonia and nitrite levels should be zero at all times. Even a small trace of these chemicals can be harmful to blue velvet shrimp. It is important to test the water regularly to make sure these levels are still at zero.

The ideal hardness for blue velvet shrimp is 6-8 dGH. They can tolerate a range of 4-14 dGH, but prefer slightly harder water. If the water is too soft, it can be stressful for them. If the water is too hard, it can cause them to develop shell problems.

Filtration

Filtration is a process used to remove solid particles from a liquid. A filter is a device that contains a porous material that allows liquid to pass through, but not solid particles.

The most common type of filter used for blue velvet cherry shrimp is a mechanical filter. This type of filter uses a medium such as paper or cloth to remove solid particles from the water.

Another type of filter that can be used is a chemical filter. This type of filter uses chemicals to remove solid particles from the water. The most common type of chemical filter is an activated carbon filter.

Blue Velvet in the tank

Do Blue Velvet Shrimp Need Air Pump?

Most Blue Velvet shrimp do not require an air pump, as they are able to get the oxygen they need from the water. However, if the water is not properly aerated, an air pump may be necessary to keep the shrimp healthy.

Aquarium Lighting

As far as lighting goes, blue velvet cherry shrimp do best in a well-lit aquarium. While they don’t require any specific type of lighting, they do need a good amount of light to maintain their vibrant coloration. If your shrimp start to look pale or washed out, it’s a good indication that they’re not getting enough light.

There are a few different ways to achieve the proper lighting for your blue velvet shrimp. One option is to use full-spectrum LED bulbs. These bulbs simulate natural sunlight and provide the shrimp with the light they need to stay healthy and colorful.

Another option is to use fluorescent bulbs. These bulbs also provide a full spectrum of light, but they’re not as intense as LED bulbs. This makes them a good option for shrimp that are a bit more sensitive to light.

Whatever type of lighting you choose, be sure to provide your shrimp with a good 12-14 hours of light per day. This will help them stay healthy and vibrant.

Plants and Decorations

If you’re looking for the perfect plant to decorate your blue velvet shrimp’s home, look no further than the anubias plant! This plant is not only beautiful, but it’s also tough and can withstand a lot of abuse, making it the perfect choice for a shrimp tank. Anubias plants are also known for being very low maintenance, so you won’t have to spend a lot of time taking care of them.

As for decorations, there are a few things you can use to really make your shrimp tank stand out. First, consider using some rocks or driftwood to create a natural-looking landscape. You can also add some live plants or fake plants to add some color and interest to the tank.

Blue Velvet in the tank

What’s the Best Substrate for Blue Velvet Shrimps?

One of the great things about blue velvet shrimp is that they are not very demanding when it comes to substrates. They can live in a variety of substrates, from sand to gravel to rocks. It is important to have a substrate that is not too fine.

In general, a good rule of thumb is to use a substrate that is similar in size to the blue velvet shrimp’s head. This will give them enough room to dig and forage without being too cramped.

While blue fire sakura shrimp can live in a variety of substrates, there are a few that stand out as being the best. Here are three of the best substrates for blue velvet shrimp:

Gravel: Gravel is a great option for blue velvet shrimp. It is easy to find, comes in a variety of colors, and is affordable. Gravel also provides a good surface for the shrimp to graze on algae.

Sand: Sand is another great substrate for blue velvet shrimp. It is soft and easy on their delicate gills and provides a good surface for them to forage for food.

Rocks: Rocks provide a more natural setting for blue velvet shrimp. They can also provide shelter and hiding places for the shrimp. Be sure to use rocks that are not too sharp or jagged, as these can injure the shrimp.

No matter which substrate you choose, be sure to rinse it thoroughly before adding it to your tank. This will help to remove any dust or debris that could harm your shrimp.

Blue Velvet in the tank

Food & Diet

It is also important to provide a balanced diet for shrimp, how to do it correctly, read below.

What Can I Feed Blue Velvet Shrimp?

These shrimp are omnivores, which means they’ll eat both plants and animals. In the wild, their diet consists of algae, detritus, and small invertebrates. In the aquarium, you can feed them a variety of foods, including pellets, flakes, frozen foods, and live foods.

It’s important to offer a variety of foods to ensure your shrimp get the nutrients they need. A good rule of thumb is to offer them two or three different types of food at each feeding.

How Often Do Blue Velvet Shrimp Need to Be Fed?

Blue velvet shrimp should be fed once or twice a day. A good rule of thumb is to feed them as much as they can eat in 2-3 minutes. It is best to remove any uneaten food after this time to avoid polluting the aquarium water.

How Long Can a Blue Velvet Shrimp Go Without Food?

A blue velvet shrimp can go without food for up to two weeks. This is because they are able to store food in their bodies for a long period of time.

Watch the Following Video on Blue Velvet Shrimp Care Guide

Behavior & Temperament

These shrimp are very active and love to swim around. They are also known to be very peaceful, making them a good choice for a community tank. They are not shy and will often come out to greet their owners when they approach the tank.

Good Tank Mates

It’s not surprising that blue velvet shrimp are such popular aquarium inhabitants; their unique blue coloration is eye-catching, and they are relatively peaceful and easy to care for. But did you know that there are certain fish and invertebrates that make particularly good tankmates for blue velvet shrimp? Here are a few of our favorites:

Small, peaceful fish:

  • Asian Stone Catfish
  • Bushynose Plecos
  • Corydora Catfish
  • Danios
  • Guppies
  • Tetras (small tetras only)
  • Hillstream Loaches
  • Otocinclus (safe to keep with breeding shrimp as well)
  • Ram Cichlids

Other shrimps:

  • Filter shrimp;
  • Vampire shrimp;
  • Singapore Flower shrimp

Snails (all types):

  • Ramshorn snails
  • Mystery snails
  • Nerite snails
  • Sulawesi snails (aka Rabbit snails)

Unsafe Tank Mates

It is not recommended to house blue velvet shrimp with fish that are known to eat invertebrates. This includes:

  • Angelfish
  • Barbs (the aggressive kinds)
  • Bettas
  • Catfish (large)
  • Cichlids
  • Crayfish (most types)
  • Discus
  • Glo Tetras
  • Goldfish
  • Gourami
  • Pacu
  • Plecos (large)

Blue Velvet Shrimp Breeding

When it comes to breeding blue velvet shrimp, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, you will need to have male and female shrimp. It is easy to tell the difference between the two, as males have much larger claws than females. You will also need a suitable breeding tank that is at least 10 gallons in size and has plenty of hiding places for the shrimp.

Blue Velvet in the tank

To get the breeding process started, you will need to condition the shrimp by feeding them a high-quality diet and keeping their tank clean. Once the shrimp are ready, the male will approach the female and gently touch her with his claws. If the female is receptive, she will allow the male to mount her and fertilize her eggs.

After fertilization, the female will carry the eggs for about two weeks before they hatch. During this time, it is important to keep the breeding tank clean and free of any predators that could eat the eggs. Once the eggs hatch, the baby shrimp will be very small and vulnerable. They will need to be fed a diet of microscopic algae and other small foods until they are large enough to eat regular shrimp pellets.

With a little patience and care, you can successfully breed blue velvet shrimp and enjoy watching them grow and flourish in your aquarium.

FAQs on How to Care for Blue Velvet shrimp

How many Blue Velvet shrimp can I put in a 10-gallon tank?

You could put around 10-12 Blue Velvet shrimp in a 10-gallon tank. But if you have other inhabitants of the aquarium – you have to make sure there is enough room for all.

Can you mix Blue and Cherry shrimp?

It is not recommended to mix different types of shrimp together, as they may have different dietary needs and preferences.

Can Blue Velvet shrimp live with Goldfish?

The blue velvet shrimp and goldfish are not a good match for tankmates for these two species have different and incompatible needs. The goldfish needs to be in an aquarium with a lot of space, a filter, and a heater. The blue velvet shrimps are more likely to be eaten by the goldfish which are larger.

Can You keep Blue Velvet shrimps together?

Yes, Blue Velvet shrimps can be kept as a group as long as they are introduced and conditioned together.

How can you tell if a Blue Velvet shrimp is male or female?

There are a few different ways to identify male and female blue velvet shrimp. One way is to examine the shrimp for the presence of a “clasper” or male appendage. This can be found on the shrimp’s abdomen. Another way is to examine the shrimp’s tail. Male shrimp will have an extended, pointed tail while females will have a round tail.

Closing Thoughts about Blue Fire Sakura Shrimp

Overall, native to Thailand and Vietnam, blue velvet shrimp are a species of freshwater shrimp that get their name from their gorgeous blue coloration. They’re a popular choice for aquariums because they’re relatively easy to care for and don’t require a lot of space.

Like all shrimp, blue velvet shrimp are scavengers and will happily munch on leftover food, algae, and detritus. This makes them a great addition to any aquarium as they help to keep the water clean. They are also peaceful creatures and can be kept with a wide variety of other fish and invertebrates.

One of the most important things to remember when keeping blue velvet shrimp is that they are very sensitive to water quality. Ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates must all be kept at 0 ppm in order to prevent shrimp from getting sick and dying. This can be achieved by doing regular water changes and using a high-quality filter.

Another important thing to remember is that blue velvet shrimp are very delicate and can easily be injured or killed by rough handling. When moving them or doing tank maintenance, be sure to use a soft net or your hands so as not to damage their delicate exoskeletons.

With proper care, blue velvet shrimp make a beautiful and interesting addition to any freshwater aquarium.

References:

  • List of freshwater aquarium invertebrate species (Wikipedia): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_freshwater_aquarium_invertebrate_species
  • Detritus (Britannica): https://www.britannica.com/science/detritus
  • Clasper (Merriam-Webster): https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/clasper

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