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52 Best Tank Mates for Betta Fish: Compatibility List

In this article, you will learn about good tank mates for beta fish. Betta fish are a popular choice for public aquariums because of their vibrant colors and active personalities. These little fish are native …

red betta fish

In this article, you will learn about good tank mates for beta fish. Betta fish are a popular choice for public aquariums because of their vibrant colors and active personalities. These little fish are native to Southeast Asia and can be found in a variety of colors, including blue, red, and green. Betta fish are known for their aggressive nature, and in the wild, they will often fight to the death. However, in an aquarium setting, they can be peaceful betta community fish.

Betta fish are relatively easy to care for, and they make a great addition to any public aquarium. They prefer to live in warm water with a pH between 6.5 and 7.5. They also like to have plenty of hiding places, so be sure to include some plants and rocks in their tank. Bettas are carnivores, so they should be fed a diet of live or frozen foods, such as brine shrimp or bloodworms.

If you’re looking for a colorful and active fish for your public aquarium, bettas are a great choice!

fish in a double aquarium

Are Betta Good for a Community Fish Tank?

Betta fish are beautiful creatures that many people enjoy keeping as pets. They are also known as Siamese fighting fish and have a reputation for being aggressive. However, there are many factors to consider when determining if betta fish are suitable for a community aquarium.

Betta fish are tropical fish and require a warm water environment. They also prefer to have a lot of hiding places and plenty of plants. If you are considering keeping betta fish in a community aquarium, it is essential to ensure that the other fish in the tank are manageable. Betta fish are known to be nippy and can sometimes harass other fish.

Another thing to consider is the fact that betta fish are very active and require a lot of space to swim. If the tank is too small, the betta fish may become stressed and start to exhibit aggressive behaviors.

Overall, betta fish can make good additions to a community aquarium, but it is important to do your research to ensure that the other fish in the tank are compatible.

Betta Temperament

Betta fish are one of the most popular fish in the aquarium trade. They are known for their beautiful fins and vibrant colors. Bettas are a member of the gourami family and are native to Southeast Asia. Bettas are also known as Siamese fighting fish because, in their native habitat, the males are often seen fighting each other.

Bettas are relatively peaceful fish, but they can be territorial. Male bettas will often fight each other if they are placed in the same tank. For this reason, it is best to keep only one male betta per tank. Female bettas can also be territorial, but to a lesser extent than males. Bettas are relatively easy to care for.

Beautiful yellow fish with big fins

Can Bettas Live in Pairs?

Warning: Male fish cannot share the same habitat without a divider between them. Males and females cannot be housed together. Females can coexist together in a sorority.

Tank Mates Depending On Tank Size

Below, you will learn about the size of a community aquarium with betta fish.

5 Gallon Aquarium

Betta fish are beautiful and unique creatures that make wonderful pets. They are also very territorial and can be aggressive toward other fish, even those of the same species. For these reasons, it is generally not a good idea to keep betta fish with other fish in a 5-gallon aquarium.

10 Gallon Aquarium

As you already know, betta fish are territorial. For this reason, it is usually not recommended to keep betta fish together with other fish in a 10-gallon aquarium. If you do decide to keep betta fish with other fish, it is important to choose peacefully and not too territorial fish.

20 Gallons or More

Although a 20-gallon aquarium is more significant than a 10-gallon and a 5-gallon tank, it is still relatively small. If you are considering keeping bettas with other fish, it is essential to research to make sure the other fish are compatible. It is best to keep betta fish in a community tank when the tank is more significant than 20 gallons.

red betta fish swim

Best Choice for Your Betta Aquarium

  1. Neon Tetra
  2. Black Neon Tetra
  3. Ember Tetra
  4. Diamond Tetra
  5. Glowlight Tetra
  6. Silver Tip Tetra
  7. Cardinal Tetra
  8. Rummy Nose Tetra
  9. Harlequin Rasbora
  10. Fire Rasbora
  11. White Cloud Mountain Minnow
  12. Endlers
  13. Corydoras Catfish (or Corys)
  14. Otocinclus Catfish
  15. Glass Catfish
  16. Kuhli Loach
  17. Guntea Loach
  18. Clown Plecos
  19. Platy (Short-finned)
  20. Short-fin Molly
  21. Cherry Barbs
  22. Celestial Pearl Danio
  23. Female Guppy

Neon Tetra

Neon Tetra on a background of algae

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 1–1.5 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons

Neon Tetra (Paracheirodon innesi) is a betta friend. The Neon Tetra is a popular aquarium fish and is one of the most recognizable fish in the freshwater aquarium trade.

The Neon Tetra is an omnivorous fish, and in the wild, it feeds on small insects, crustaceans, and worms. In the aquarium, it will readily accept the most commercially prepared fish foods, including flakes, pellets, and frozen foods.

It is an ideal fish for the community aquarium and can be kept with other peaceful fish such as Corydoras catfish, Betta, and Tetras.

Black Neon Tetra

smal black-neon-tetra

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: Up to 1.6 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons

The Black Neon Tetra is a freshwater fish that is native to the Amazon River Basin in South America.

It is a peaceful fish that can be kept with other peaceful fish of similar size. The Black Neon Tetra is a omnivore and will eat most aquarium foods, including flakes, pellets, and live foods.

Ember Tetra

small yellow ember tetra

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 0.6–0.8 inch
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons

The Ember Tetra, Hyphessobrycon amandae, is a species of freshwater fish in the characin family (family Characidae) of order Characiformes. The fish is native to the Amazon basin in South America. It is a popular aquarium fish and has been introduced to several other countries.

The Ember Tetra is a peaceful fish. It is an omnivorous fish that feeds on small insects, crustaceans, and other small invertebrates.

Diamond Tetra

diamond tetra swim

Care level: Beginner
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 2.5 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 15 gallons

The diamond tetra is a popular aquarium fish and is known for its iridescent blue body and sparkling scales.

The diamond tetra is a peaceful fish well-suited to life in a community aquarium. It is an active swimmer and prefers to live in groups of 6 or more fish. The diamond tetra is an omnivorous fish and will eat a variety of foods, including live, frozen, and flake foods.

Glowlight Tetra

glowlight tetra swim

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 1.5 inches
Diet: Omnivorous
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons

Glowlight tetras are freshwater fish that are popular in aquariums. They are small fish, only reaching about 1.5 inches in length.

They are peaceful fish that do well in community tanks. They are named for their bright orange or red coloration, which is accented by a bright blue line that runs along their sides. Glowlight tetras are omnivorous and will eat a variety of foods, including flakes, pellets, and live foods.

Silver Tip Tetra

fish with silver fins

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Mostly peaceful, can be aggressive in certain circumstances
Size: 1.2 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

The Silver Tip Tetra is a beautiful fish that is native to the rivers of South America. They are peaceful fish that does well in a community aquarium. The Silver Tip Tetra is silver with a black stripe that runs from the tip of the nose to the base of the tail.

Silver Tip Tetras are omnivores and will eat a variety of foods, including flakes, pellets, frozen, and live. It is important to have a varied diet to keep them healthy. They prefer to live in groups of 6 or more and do best in an aquarium of at least 20 gallons.

Cardinal Tetra

flock of fish

Care level: Intermediate
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 2 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

The cardinal tetra (Paracheirodon axelrodi) is a freshwater fish of the characin family (family Characidae) of order Characiformes. The fish is native to the Orinoco River basin in the rainforests of South America.

The cardinal tetra is a popular aquarium fish. The fish is easy to care for and is tolerant of many water conditions. The fish is often kept in freshwater aquariums. The cardinal tetra is a peaceful fish and can be kept with other peaceful fish. The fish does best in an aquarium with plenty of vegetation.

Rummy Nose Tetra

three rummy nose tetra

Care level: Moderate
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 2-2.5 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

Rummy Nose Tetra (Hemigrammus rhodostomus) is a peaceful, schooling fish that is a popular choice for many aquariums.

Rummy nose tetras are schooling fish, which means they do best when kept in groups of at least 6-8 fish. They are a peaceful species that gets along well with other peaceful fish. Rummy nose tetras are not known to be fin nippers.

Harlequin Rasbora

two harlequin rasbora

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 1.75–2 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons

Harlequin Rasbora (Trigonostigma heteromorpha) is a beautiful, peaceful fish that makes a perfect addition to any community aquarium. They are easy to care for and will thrive in a wide range of water conditions.

They are known to be shy fish, so it’s best to keep them in groups of 6 or more. They will do best in an aquarium with plenty of hiding places and plenty of open space to swim.

Harlequin Rasboras are omnivores and will eat a wide variety of foods. In the wild, they feed on insects, small crustaceans, and algae. In the aquarium, they will accept most flakes and pellets, as well as frozen and live foods. It’s best to give them a varied diet for optimal health.

Fire Rasbora

two fire rasbora

Care level: Moderate
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 2 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 15 gallons

The Fire Rasbora (Boraras brigittae) is a species of fish in the family Cyprinidae. The fish is native to fresh water habitats in Southeast Asia.

The Fire Rasbora is a peaceful fish that is best kept in groups of six or more fish. The fish is an omnivore and will eat various foods, including live, frozen, and flake foods.

White Cloud Mountain Minnow

fish with a red fin

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 1.5 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10-12 gallons

The White Cloud Mountain Minnow is one of the most popular freshwater aquarium fish. Native to China, this little fish is hardy and easy to care for, making it a great choice for beginner aquarium enthusiasts. Although they are peaceful by nature, White Cloud Mountain Minnows can be nippy with other fish that share their tank.

Endlers

yellow speckled fish

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 1.5 – 2 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons

Endlers (Poecilia wingei) are freshwater fish that are closely related to guppies.

Endlers are omnivorous and will eat a variety of foods, including live foods, flakes, and pellets. They are also known to be good at eating algae.

Endlers are peaceful fish and can be kept with other peaceful fish, such as guppies, mollies, and betta. They do best in an aquarium with plenty of hiding places and vegetation.

Corydoras Catfish (or Corys)

a fish with a black flat on its back

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 1–4 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons

Corys fish are one of the most popular freshwater aquarium fish. They are peaceful, easy to care for, and can be kept in a community tank with other fish. Corys are bottom-dwellers, and their diet consists mainly of algae and other small food items.

Corys are a member of the catfish family and are native to South America. There are many different species of Corys, but the most common in the aquarium trade are the Bronze Cory (Corydoras aeneus), the Peppered Cory (Corydoras paleatus), and the Panda Cory (Corydoras panda).

Corys are very easy to care for and make an ideal addition to a community tank. They are peaceful fish that get along well with other fish. Corys prefer to live in groups, so it is best to keep them in pairs or groups of three or more.

Otocinclus Catfish

the fish swim in the seaweed

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 1–2 inches
Diet: Herbivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons

These little fish are native to South America where they inhabit slow-moving rivers and streams. Otocinclus are members of the family Loricariidae, which contains over 600 species of armored catfish. The Otocinclus genus contains about 15 species, but only a few are commonly seen in the aquarium trade.

Otocinclus are known for their voracious appetite for algae. In the wild, they spend most of their time grazing on algae growing on rocks and other surfaces. In the aquarium, they will readily eat algae growing on the glass, plants, and décor.

While algae are their primary food source, Otocinclus should also be offered a variety of other foods, such as blanched vegetables, brine shrimp, and bloodworms. A good-quality algae wafer or tablet can also be offered as supplemental food.

Glass Catfish

Glass Catfish Shoal

Care level: Moderate
Temperament: Calm
Size: 5 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 30 gallons

Glass catfish are a species of freshwater fish that are native to Southeast Asia. They get their name from their transparent bodies, which allow you to see their internal organs.

Glass catfish are peaceful fish that do well in community tanks. They are active fish that enjoy swimming and hiding in plant life. Glass catfish are not easy to breed in captivity, so most that are sold are wild-caught.

Kuhli Loach

guntea loach lies at the bottom

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 3–4 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

Kuhli loaches are small, eel-like freshwater fish that is native to Southeast Asia. They are popular aquarium fish because of their unique appearance and peaceful nature.

Kuhli loaches are bottom-dwellers and prefer to live in areas with plenty of hiding places. They are peaceful fish and do well when kept with other peaceful fish species. They are omnivorous and will eat both live and frozen foods.

Guntea Loach

fish lies at the bottom of the aquarium

Care level: Intermediate
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 5.9 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

Guntea Loach is a freshwater fish that is found in streams and rivers in Southeast Asia. It is a member of the loach family and is closely related to the barbel loach.

The guntea loach is a bottom-dwelling fish and is often found hiding among rocks and stones. It is a peaceful fish and is often seen in groups. The guntea loach is an omnivorous fish and feeds on insects, worms, and small crustaceans.

Clown Plecos

striped Clown Plecos

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 3.5–4 inches
Diet: Wood eater, Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

Clown Plecos are a species of freshwater fish that is native to South America. They are a member of the Loricariidae family, which contains over 700 different species of suckermouth catfish.

Clown Plecos are popular aquarium fish because of their unique appearance and peaceful nature. They are relatively easy to care for, but do require a tank with plenty of hiding places and a diet of live and frozen foods.

These fish are nocturnal and prefer to spend their days hiding among the plants and rocks in their tank. At night, they will come out to forage for food. Clown Plecos are not territorial and can be kept with other peaceful fish species.

Platy (Short-finned)

yellow fish with an orange tail

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: Up to 3 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons

Platy (platyfish) is a small, freshwater fish belonging to the family Platyidae in the suborder Cyprinodontiformes. The platy is a popular aquarium fish due to its hardiness and vibrant colors.

Platies are native to Central America and parts of South America, but have been introduced to other continents as well. They prefer slow-moving water with plenty of vegetation. In the wild, platies are omnivorous, feeding on algae, small insects, and other small invertebrates.

In the aquarium, platies are relatively easy to care for. They are not fussy eaters and will accept the most commercially available fish foods. They prefer to live in groups, so it is best to keep them in pairs or small shoals. Platies are also known to be good betta tank mates and for other peaceful fish species.

Short-fin Molly

gray fish with a blue tail

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 6 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

The Molly is a tropical fish that is popular in home aquariums. There are several species of Molly, but the Short-fin Molly is the most popular.

It is a peaceful fish that gets along well with other fish. The Short-fin Molly is a hardy fish that is easy to care for. It can live in a variety of conditions, but prefers water that is slightly alkaline. The Short-fin Molly is an omnivore and will eat most aquarium foods.

Cherry Barbs

bright orange fish

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: Up to 2 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 25 gallons

Cherry barbs (Puntius titteya) are small freshwater fish that is native to Sri Lanka. They get their name from their bright red coloration. Cherry barbs are peaceful fish that do well in community tanks. They are active and playful, and make a great addition to any aquarium.

Cherry barbs are relatively easy to care for. They prefer a tank with plenty of hiding places and plenty of plants. They are not picky eaters, and will eat most aquarium foods.

Celestial Pearl Danio

fish on a blue background

Care level: Moderate
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 0.75–1 inch
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons

Celestial Pearl Danio, also known as Galaxy Rasbora, is a freshwater fish native to Myanmar. The fish is characterized by its iridescent white body with black spots and long, flowing fins.

The Celestial Pearl Danio is a peaceful fish that does well in community tanks. The fish is omnivorous and will eat most aquarium foods, including flakes, pellets, and live or frozen foods.

Female Guppy

two female guppy

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 0.6–2.4 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 5 gallons

Female guppies are typically larger than males and have longer fins. They are also more colorful, with brighter and more elaborate patterns. Male guppies are more drab in coloration and have shorter fins.

Female guppies are omnivorous, so they will eat a variety of both meat and plant-based foods. A good quality flake or pellet food should form the basis of their diet, but they will also enjoy occasional treats of live or frozen foods. Brine shrimp, bloodworms, and daphnia are all good options.

What is a Betta Sorority?

A sorority tank is a freshwater aquarium that houses multiple female bettas. These tanks are typically at least 10 gallons and have plenty of hiding places for the bettas. In a sorority tank, the bettas have the opportunity to socialize with each other and form their own hierarchy.

There are a few things to consider when choosing tank mates for a betta sorority.

  1. The first is whether or not the fish are compatible in terms of temperament. Bettas are relatively peaceful fish, so you’ll want to avoid tank mates that are known to be aggressive.
  2. Another thing to consider is the size of the fish. Bettas are relatively small fish, so you’ll want to avoid tank mates that are too large. This is because large fish can easily outcompete bettas for food and space.
  3. Finally, you’ll want to consider the water conditions that the fish need. Bettas prefer warm, shallow water, so you’ll want to avoid tank mates that require cooler or deeper water.

two aquariums are illuminated by a lamp

Betta Sorority Tank Mates

  • Neon Tetra
  • Black Neon Tetra
  • Cory Catfish
  • Guntea Loach
  • Cherry Barbs
  • Guppies

List of Best Tank Mates for Female Betta

Below is a list of the best mates:

  • Yoyo Loach
  • Clown Loach
  • Panda Cory
  • Pygmy Cory
  • Clown Pleco
  • Mosquito Rasbora
  • Gold Tetra
  • Blue Tetra
  • Redeye Tetra
  • Pristella Tetra
  • Black Phantom Tetra
  • Penguin Tetra

List of Best Male Betta Tank Mates

And here is a list with the best males:

  • Dawn Tetra
  • Green Neon Tetra
  • Colombian Tetra
  • Head and Tail Light Tetra
  • Black Line Rasbora
  • Zebra Loach
  • Albino Cory
  • Bristle Nose Pleco
  • Snowball Pleco
  • Candy Striped Pleco

Other Tank Mates That Can Live With Bettas:

Not only fish can live with a betta. Good buddies for them will also be:

  • Malaysian Trumpet Snails
  • Mystery Snail
  • Nerite Snail
  • Ghost Shrimp
  • Amano Shrimp
  • African Dwarf Frog
  • Marimo Moss Ball

Fish That You Shouldn’t Keep with Bettas

There are certain fish that you should not keep with bettas. These fish include:

  • Other Male Bettas
  • Goldfish
  • Cichlids
  • Gouramis
  • Tiger Barbs
  • Chinese Algae Eaters
  • Puffers
  • Red Tail Sharks
  • Angelfish

The reason you should not keep these fish with bettas is that they all have different care requirements.

Watch the Following Video on Bad Betta Buddies

FAQs on Angelfish Tank Mates

Can Angelfish live with Bettas?

It is generally not recommended to keep angelfish with Bettas, as the larger angelfish may become aggressive and nip at the Betta’s fins.

Can Bettas live with Guppies?

It is possible for Bettas to live with Guppies, but it is not recommended. Bettas need a lot of space to themselves, and Guppies will often outcompete them for food and territory. But bettas can live with female guppies.

Do Betta fish need tank mates at all?

No, Betta fish do not need tank mates. In fact, Betta fish are often recommended for those new to fishkeeping, as they are relatively easy to care for and do not require a large tank. But if you decide to keep Betta with other fish, stick to our list of the best buddies for Betta fish.

Final Thoughts: Should You Keep Bettas in a Community Tank?

If you’re looking for a colorful and lively addition to your public aquarium, betta fish is a great option! Though they are often kept as solitary pets, bettas can actually be quite social creatures and do well in community tanks as long as they are properly introduced and have plenty of hiding places.

References:

  • Siamese fighting fish (Wikipedia): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siamese_fighting_fish
  • Osphronemus goramy Lacepède (nas.er.usgs.gov): https://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/FactSheet.aspx?speciesID=798

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