36 Best Tank Mates for Angelfish

Angelfish are a type of freshwater fish that is native to South America. They are a popular choice for aquariums because of their beautiful appearance and relatively peaceful nature. There are many different species of …

Two fish in an aquarium

Angelfish are a type of freshwater fish that is native to South America. They are a popular choice for aquariums because of their beautiful appearance and relatively peaceful nature.

There are many different species of angelfish, and they come in various colors and patterns. Angelfish are typically small, only growing to be a few inches long.

In this article, you will learn the answer to the question, “what fish can live with angelfish”. And also, what kind of fish is better not to keep together with angelfish?

Are Angelfish Good for a Community Fish Tank?

Angelfish are a type of cichlid fish that are native to South America. They are a popular choice for aquariums because of their bright colors and elegant shapes. However, there are a few things to consider before adding angelfish to a public aquarium.

Angelfish are known to be aggressive towards other fish, both in the wild and in captivity. This can cause problems in a public aquarium where there are many different species of fish. Angelfish can also be territorial and may fight with other fish for space.

Another thing to consider is that angelfish need a lot of space. They need at least a 30-gallon aquarium and prefer to have plenty of hiding places and plants. Without enough space, angelfish can become stressed and may not thrive.

Overall, angelfish can be a beautiful addition to a public aquarium, but there are a few things to keep in mind. If you decide to add angelfish to your aquarium, be sure to provide plenty of space and hiding places.

Colorful fish in an aquarium

List of Best Tank Mates for Angelfish

  1. Boesemani Rainbow Fish
  2. Praecox Rainbow Fish
  3. Kribensis Cichlid (Rainbow Kribs)
  4. Ram Cichlids
  5. Keyhole Cichlids
  6. Kribensis Cichlids
  7. Corydoras Catfish
  8. Otocinclus Catfish
  9. Synodontis Catfish
  10. Hatchetfish
  11. Siamese Algae Eater
  12. Kuhli Loach
  13. Dwarf Gourami
  14. Three-spot Gourami
  15. Zebra Loaches
  16. Platies (Platy Fish)
  17. Bristlenose Pleco (Bushy Nose Сatfish)
  18. Rubbernose Pleco
  19. Common Plecostomus
  20. Mollies (Molly Fish)
  21. Swordtails
  22. Guppies
  23. Rummy Nose Tetra
  24. Head and Tail Light Tetra
  25. Rosy Tetra
  26. Lemon Tetra
  27. Neon Tetras
  28. Black Skirt Tetra
  29. Cardinal Tetra
  30. Bleeding Heart Tetra
  31. Zebra Danios
  32. Discus Fish
  33. German Blue Ram
  34. Electric Blue Ram
  35. Bolivian Ram
  36. Silver Dollar

Boesemani Rainbow Fish

Colorful Boesemani Rainbow Fish

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: Up to 4.5 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 30 gallons

The Boesemani rainbow fish is a freshwater fish that is native to Indonesia. The Boesemani best fish to keep with angelfish. It is a member of the family Melanotaeniidae, which includes other rainbowfish species.

The Boesemani rainbow fish is one of the most popular rainbowfish species and is often kept as a pet. It is a brightly-colored fish, with a blue body and orange fins.

The Boesemani rainbow fish is a peaceful fish and gets along well with other fish species. It is an omnivorous fish and will eat a variety of foods, including live food, flakes, and pellets.

The Boesemani rainbow fish is a hardy fish and is not overly sensitive to water conditions. It is a good choice for a beginner aquarium.

Praecox Rainbow Fish

Praecox rainbow fish swim

Care level: Easy to Moderate
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 3 to 3.5 inches
Diet: Omnivorous
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

Praecox rainbowfish are one of the most popular aquarium fish. They are known for their vibrant colors and peaceful nature. Praecox rainbowfish are native to Australia and New Guinea.

Praecox rainbowfish are omnivores. They will eat a variety of foods, including live food, frozen food, and flakes. A good diet for them includes a mix of live food (such as brine shrimp or bloodworms) and high-quality flakes or pellets.

Praecox rainbowfish are social fish and do best when kept in groups. They are peaceful fish and can be kept with other peaceful fish. When kept in groups, they will often establish a hierarchy, with a dominant male at the top.

Kribensis Cichlid (Rainbow Kribs)

Rainbow kribs fish

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: Approximately 4 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

Kribensis cichlid (Pelvicachromis pulcher) is a freshwater fish belonging to the cichlid family. It is native to West Africa and is found in the rivers and streams of the countries of Cameroon, Nigeria, Benin, Togo, and Ghana. The kribensis cichlid is a small fish. It is a popular aquarium fish and is kept by many fish keepers.

The kribensis cichlid is a peaceful fish and can be kept with other peaceful cichlids and non-cichlid fish. It is an omnivorous fish and will eat most types of food, including live, frozen, and flake foods. The kribensis cichlid is a good beginner’s fish as it is easy to care for and is relatively disease-resistant.

Ram Cichlids

black ram cichlids

Care level: Moderate
Temperament: Calm and peaceful
Size: 2-3 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 20-gallon

Ram cichlids are a species of cichlid fish that are native to South America. They are a popular choice for aquariums due to their vibrant colors and relatively peaceful nature.

Ram cichlids are generally peaceful fish, but they can be territorial toward other cichlids. They should be kept with other peaceful fish that are of similar size.

Keyhole Cichlids

yellow keyhole cichlids

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Timid and even-tempered
Size: Approximately 4.75 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

In the wild, keyhole cichlids are found in slow-moving rivers and streams in South America. They are peaceful fish that typically lives in small groups. In the aquarium, these fish do best in a group as well. They are not overly aggressive, but can become territorial if they do not have enough space.

Keyhole cichlids are omnivorous and will eat a variety of foods, including pellets, flakes, and live or frozen foods. It is important to provide a varied diet to ensure that your fish get the nutrients they need.

Kribensis Cichlids

two rainbow kribs swim

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: Approximately 4 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

Kribensis cichlids (Pelvicachromis pulcher) are a species of cichlid fish native to West Africa. They are popular freshwater aquarium fish and are known for their bright colors and interesting behaviors.

Kribensis cichlids are omnivorous and will eat most types of aquarium foods, including flakes, pellets, and live foods such as brine shrimp and bloodworms. They are also known to be good at eating algae.

Kribensis cichlids are generally peaceful fish, but they can be territorial and aggressive toward other fish, especially of the same species. They are best kept with other peaceful fish species that are not too small, as they may be bullied or eaten by the kribensis cichlids.

Corydoras Catfish

small Corydoras Catfish

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 1–4 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons

There are many different types of Corydoras Catfish, but they all have a few things in common. They are all small, peaceful fish that add great to any aquarium. They are also very active and will often be seen swimming around in groups.

Corydoras Catfish are native to South America, and their natural habitat is in slow-moving rivers and streams. They are bottom-dwellers and spend most of their time scavenging for food. In the wild, they feed on small insects, worms, and plant matter.

In the aquarium, Corydoras Catfish should be provided with a variety of foods, including live and frozen foods, as well as sinking pellets and tablets. They should also be given plenty of hiding places, as they like to retreat into caves and crevices when they feel threatened.

Corydoras Catfish are very easy to care for and are ideal for beginners. They are very hardy and can tolerate a wide range of water conditions. They are also very tolerant of other fish, making them good community fish.

Otocinclus Catfish

small otocinclus catfish

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 1–2 inches
Diet: Herbivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons

Otocinclus Catfish are one of the most popular freshwater aquarium fish. They are peaceful, easy to care for and make a great addition to any community tank.

These little catfish are native to South America and can be found in a variety of habitats, including rivers, streams, and ponds. In the wild, they typically eat algae, but in the aquarium, they will also consume leftover fish food, detritus, and even algae wafers.

Otocinclus are schooling fish, so they should be kept in groups of at least six.

While Otocinclus are relatively easy to care for, they are sensitive to changes in water quality and parameters. It is important to do regular water changes and to keep a close eye on the ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate levels in the tank.

Synodontis Catfish

Spotted Synodontis catfish

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 4 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

If you’re looking for a unique, peaceful addition to your freshwater aquarium, you may want to consider a Synodontis catfish. These nocturnal bottom-dwellers are native to Africa, and come in a variety of colors and patterns.

Synodontis catfish are peaceful fish, but they can be territorial with their own species. They’re also known to be fin nippers, so it’s best to keep them with fish that are too large to be considered potential prey. They prefer to live in groups, so if you’re keeping more than one, plan on a minimum of three.

These fish are relatively easy to care for, but there are a few things to keep in mind. They’re nocturnal, so they’ll be most active at night. This means you may not see them much during the day. They also prefer dimly lit aquariums, so don’t go too crazy with the lighting.

Hatchetfish

Hatchetfish at the water's surface

Care level: Intermediate to advanced
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 1 – 1.4 inches
Diet: Insect larvae
Minimum tank size: 30-gallon

Hatchetfish are small, deep-sea fish that get their name from their distinctive body shape. They have large eyes and long, flat bodies with a hatchet-like tail.

Despite their small size, hatchetfish are among the fastest and most agile swimmers in the ocean. Hatchetfish are also able to make sudden turns and stops, which helps them to escape from predators.

Siamese Algae Eater

siamese algae eater swim

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 6 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

If you are looking for a fish that will do a great job of eating algae in your aquarium, the Siamese Algae Eater (SAE) is a good choice. The Siamese Algae Eater is a peaceful fish that gets along well with other fish. It is an active swimmer and does best in an aquarium with plenty of open space to swim.

The Siamese Algae Eater is native to Southeast Asia and is found in Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam. It is a bottom-dweller and prefers slow-moving waters. The fish is brown or black in color with a white belly.

This fish is a voracious eater of algae and will help keep your aquarium clean.

Kuhli Loach

kuhli loach swims near the bottom

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 3–4 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

Kuhli loaches are a species of freshwater fish that is native to Southeast Asia. They are a popular choice for aquariums because of their small size and playful personality. Kuhlis are bottom-dwellers and do best in groups of five or more fish. They are nocturnal creatures and prefer to hide during the day.

Kuhlis are omnivores and will eat just about anything, but they prefer a diet of live or frozen foods. Bloodworms, brine shrimp, and daphnia are all good choices. They also enjoy sinking pellets and flakes.

Kuhlis are peaceful fish and do well with other peaceful species. They are often found in aquariums with other loaches, angelfish, and tetras. Kuhlis are not aggressive and will not bother other fish in the tank.

Dwarf Gourami

beautiful dwarf gourami

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 4 – 4.5 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons

Dwarf Gourami (Trichogaster lalius) is a freshwater fish that is popular in the aquarium trade. They are native to South Asia and are found in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh.

Dwarf gouramis are peaceful fish and can be kept with other peaceful fish of similar size. They are not territorial and do not need a lot of space. They are good community fish and can be kept in a freshwater aquarium with other fish, such as angelfish, mollies, platies, and swordtails.

Dwarf gouramis are omnivorous and will eat a variety of foods, including live food, frozen food, and flake food. They should be given a varied diet to ensure they are getting all the nutrients they need.

Three-spot Gourami

fish with three spots

Care level: Intermediate to advanced
Temperament: Mostly placid, but the male can be aggressive
Size: 5 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 30-gallons

If you’re a fan of freshwater fish, then you’ve probably come across the three-spot gourami (Trichogaster trichopterus). This popular fish is native to Southeast Asia and is easily recognizable by its bright colors and three spots on its body.

The three-spot gourami is omnivorous and will eat a variety of foods, including pellets, flakes, live food, and frozen food. When kept in an aquarium, it’s important to provide plenty of hiding places and plants for the three-spot gourami to feel comfortable. This fish is not recommended for beginner aquarium enthusiasts because of its specific care requirements.

Zebra Loaches

Striped Zebra Loaches

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 3 to 4 inches
Diet: Omnivorous
Minimum tank size: 20 to 30 gallons

Zebra loaches are a species of freshwater fish that is native to Southeast Asia. They are a popular choice for aquariums because of their striking black-and-white striped appearance. Zebra loaches are peaceful fish that do well in angelfish community tanks. They are active swimmers and prefer to live in groups.

Zebra loaches are bottom-dwellers and prefer to hide among rocks and plants. They are scavengers and will help to keep the tank clean by eating uneaten food and algae. Zebra loaches are sensitive to water quality and prefer a well-oxygenated tank with a sandy substrate.

Platies (Platy Fish)

yellow Platies fish

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: Up to 3 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons

Platies are small freshwater fish that are popular among aquarium enthusiasts. They are easy to care for and are known for their brightly colored bodies. Platies are peaceful fish, which makes them a good choice for a community tank. They are native to Central America and can be found in a variety of habitats, from slow-moving rivers to fast-flowing streams.

There are many different species of platies, and they come in a wide range of colors. The most common platies are the Mickey Mouse Platy (Xiphophorus variatus), the Southern Platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus), and the Common Platy (Xiphophorus platyfish).

If you’re thinking of adding some platies to your aquarium, be sure to research the different species to find the ones that best fit your tank.

Bristlenose Pleco (Bushy Nose Сatfish)

Bushy Nose Сatfish

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 4–5 inches
Diet: Herbivore
Minimum tank size: 30 gallons

If you’re a fan of plecos, then the Bristlenose Pleco (Ancistrus dolichopterus) is a must-have fish for your aquarium. As its name suggests, this species of pleco is distinguished by the bushy “whiskers” or “bristles” that protrude from its head. While these bristles may look formidable, they’re actually quite soft to the touch.

The Bristlenose Pleco is a hardy fish that is native to the rivers of South America. In the wild, they can be found in a variety of habitats, from fast-flowing streams to stagnant pools.

This pleco is a peaceful fish that gets along well with other freshwater angelfish tank mates. It’s a nocturnal creature that will spend most of the day hiding in caves or other dark places in the tank.

Rubbernose Pleco

Spotted Rubber Hose Pleco

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 6 inch
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 30 gallons

The Rubbernose pleco (Chaetostoma milesi), is a freshwater fish native to the Orinoco River basin in South America. It is a member of the family Loricariidae, and is the only species in the genus Chaetostoma.

The diet of the Rubbernose pleco consists of algae, detritus, and small invertebrates. The fish is a scavenger and is often seen cleaning the substrate of aquariums.

The Rubbernose pleco is a popular aquarium fish. It is peaceful and can be kept with other peaceful species. The fish does best in an aquarium with plenty of hiding places and a substrate of sand or fine gravel.

Common Plecostomus

fish head

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 20–24 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 30 gallons

Plecostomus, also known as plecos, are a diverse group of catfish that are popular in the aquarium trade. There are many different species of plecos, but the most common plecostomus in the aquarium trade is the Common Plecostomus (Plecostomus plecostomus).

The Common Plecostomus is a peaceful fish that is well-suited for community aquariums. They are nocturnal fish, so they are most active at night. During the day, they will often hide among the plants or rocks in the aquarium.

The Common Plecostomus is a scavenger fish, so it is important to provide them with a diet that includes plenty of vegetable matter. They will also consume algae that grow in the aquarium.

Mollies (Molly Fish)

black-and-white fish

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 3.5–4.5 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons

So, can angelfish live with mollies? Molly Fish is a type of freshwater fish that are popular in home aquariums. Molly fish are known for their peaceful nature and their ability to adapt to a wide range of water conditions. While they are hardy fish, they are also sensitive to changes in water quality and temperature. Molly fish are available in a variety of colors, including black, white, silver, and gold.

Molly fish are native to Central America and typically live in slow-moving waters. In the wild, they are omnivorous and will eat a variety of plant and animal matter. In captivity, they should be fed a diet of high-quality flakes or pellets, as well as live or frozen foods.

Swordtails

beautiful Swordtails

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: Up to 6.5 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10-20 gallons

Swordtails are a type of freshwater fish that are popular in aquaria. They are named for their long, sword-like tails. Swordtails are relatively easy to care for and can live in a variety of water conditions.

Swordtails are native to Central and South America, and can be found in a variety of colors and patterns. The most common colors seen in swordtails are red, green, and brown.

Swordtails are omnivorous, and will eat a variety of foods. In the wild, they eat algae, small insects, and crustaceans. In an aquarium, they can be fed a variety of foods, including flakes, pellets, and live foods.

Swordtails are social fish and do best when kept in groups. They are relatively peaceful, but can be territorial towards other fish with similar body shapes. Swordtails are also known to be good jumpers, so a secure lid is necessary to prevent them from escaping.

Guppies

two guppies

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 0.6–2.4 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 5 gallons

If you’re looking for a fun and relatively easy-to-care-for fish, guppies might be the right fit for you! These freshwater fish are brightly colored and can add some excitement to your home aquarium.

Guppies originate from South America and can be found in a variety of colors and patterns.

Guppies are not overly demanding when it comes to food and will typically eat whatever flake food or pellets you provide. However, it is always a good idea to supplement their diet with some live or frozen foods such as brine shrimp or bloodworms.

As social creatures, guppies do best when kept in groups. A good rule of thumb is to have 2-3 guppies for every 1 gallon of water. If you plan to keep both male and female guppies together, it is best to have a ratio of 3 females to 1 male. This will help to avoid any aggression from the males.

Rummy Nose Tetra

school of fish

Care level: Moderate
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 2-2.5 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

Rummy nose tetra (Carnegiella strigata) is a freshwater fish native to South America. It is a member of the family Characidae, which includes many other popular aquarium fish, such as the neon tetra. They are silver in color, with a horizontal black stripe running along their body. The name “rummy nose” comes from the red coloration on the fish’s nose and head.

Rummy nose tetras are peaceful fish that do well in community tanks. They are not demanding when it comes to water conditions and can tolerate a wide range of temperatures. Rummy nose tetras are omnivorous and will eat most types of aquarium fish food, including flakes, pellets, and live/frozen foods.

fish with a spot on its tail

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 2 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 15 gallon

The Head and Tail Light Tetra (Hemigrammus ocellifer) is a freshwater fish of the characin family (Characidae), native to South America. It is a popular aquarium fish due to its brightly-colored body and peaceful demeanor.

The Head and Tail Light Tetra is a peaceful fish that does well in community tanks. The Head and Tail Light Tetra is an omnivore and will eat most kinds of dry and live foods.

Rosy Tetra

almost transparent fish

Care level: Beginner
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 1.6 to 2.5 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 15 gallon

Rosy Tetra (Paracheirodon innesi) is a freshwater fish of the characin family (family Characidae) of order Characiformes. The rosy tetra is native to the upper Orinoco and Negro rivers in South America.

The rosy tetra is a small, laterally compressed fish. It is pink to rosy in coloration, with a silvery belly. The fins are clear.

The rosy tetra is a popular aquarium fish. It is peaceful and relatively easy to care for. It does well in a well-planted aquarium with hiding places.

Lemon Tetra

two lemon tetra

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Calm but active swimmers
Size: 2 inches
Diet: Live or frozen brine shrimp, mosquito larvae, and bloodworms
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

Lemon tetra (Hyphessobrycon pulchripinnis) is a freshwater fish of the characin family (Characidae) of order Characiformes. The lemon tetra is a popular aquarium fish and is found in the wild in the Orinoco Basin in South America.

Lemon tetras are small, peaceful fish that makes a great addition to any community aquarium. They are named for their bright yellow coloration, which is accented by a black horizontal stripe that runs along the length of the body. Lemon tetras are relatively easy to care for and will do well in a tank that is at least 20 gallons in size.

Neon Tetras

small neon tetras

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 1–1.5 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons

Neon tetras are one of the most popular fish in the aquarium trade. They are small, peaceful, and colorful, making them a perfect addition to any community tank. Neon tetras are native to the Amazon basin in South America and can be found in a variety of colors, including blue, green, and red.

Despite their small size, neon tetras are relatively hardy fish and can adapt to a wide range of water conditions. They prefer to live in groups and should be kept in an aquarium with at least 8-10 other neon tetras. Neon tetras are omnivorous and will eat a variety of foods, but should be given a diet that is high in protein.

Black Skirt Tetra

fish with a large fin

Care level: Moderate
Temperament: Mildly aggressive
Size: 1-2.5 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 15 gallons

The Black Skirt Tetra (Gymnocorymbus ternetzi) is a freshwater fish native to South America. It is a member of the Characidae family and is closely related to the White Skirt Tetra (Gymnocorymbus thayeri).

The Black Skirt Tetra gets its name from the long, black fins that extend from its body. The Black Skirt Tetra is a peaceful fish and is known to be a good community tank mate. It is a hardy fish that is relatively easy to care for, making it a good choice for beginner aquarists.

The Black Skirt Tetra is an omnivorous fish and will eat a variety of foods, including flakes, pellets, brine shrimp, and bloodworms. It is important to provide a varied diet to keep the Black Skirt Tetra healthy. The Black Skirt Tetra is a social fish and does best when kept in groups of 6 or more. It is a relatively active fish and will do well in an aquarium with plenty of hiding places and swimming space.

Cardinal Tetra

three cardinal tetra

Care level: Intermediate
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 2 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

Cardinal Tetra (Paracheirodon axelrodi) is a freshwater fish native to the Orinoco River basin in South America.

The cardinal tetra is a small fish growing to a maximum length of only 2 inches. It has a laterally compressed body, and its coloration is a bright red on the dorsal (upper) side, with a blue stripe running along the length of the body. The ventral (lower) side of the fish is silver-white. The cardinal tetra is a peaceful fish and can be kept with other small, peaceful fish, such as neon tetras and guppies.

The cardinal tetra is an omnivore, and in the wild, its diet consists of small insects, crustaceans, and algae. The aquarium will accept a wide variety of foods, including flake food, frozen foods, and live foods.

Bleeding Heart Tetra

pink fish

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: Up to 2.5 inches
Diet: Carnivore
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

The Bleeding Heart Tetra (Hyphessobrycon erythrostigma) is a popular aquarium fish that is native to the tropical waters of South America. The Bleeding Heart Tetra gets its name from the red markings on its body which resemble a heart shape. The Bleeding Heart Tetra is a peaceful fish that is ideal for community tanks. They are easy to care for and can be kept in a variety of different tank setups.

Zebra Danios

little striped fish

Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful, playful
Size: 1.5–2.5 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons

Zebra Danios are freshwater fish that are native to South and Southeast Asia.

Zebra Danios are known for their stripes, which are black and white. They are peaceful fish and can be kept with other peaceful fish. Zebra Danios are easy to care for and can live in a variety of water conditions.

Discus Fish

three discus fish

Care level: Challenging, requires a higher temperature than many other species
Temperament: Intelligent, peaceful, shy
Size: 4.6–8 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons per fish, or over 55 gallons for a group of six fish

Discus fish are a fascinating and beautiful species of freshwater fish that originate from the Amazon River basin in South America.

They are slow-moving fish and prefer to spend their time in the middle or bottom of the tank. They are also schooling fish, so it is best to keep them in groups of at least six.

Discus are omnivorous, and their diet should consist of both plant and animal matter. They are particularly fond of live or frozen foods, such as bloodworms, brine shrimp, and daphnia. It is important to provide them with a varied diet, as this will help to keep their coloration vibrant.

Discus are not the easiest fish to care for, and they are often recommended for experienced aquarium enthusiasts. They are sensitive to water quality, and their tank must be kept clean and well-filtered. They are also susceptible to diseases, so regular water testing and maintenance are essential.

German Blue Ram

yellow fish with a black stripe on the eye

Care level: Intermediate
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 2–3 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 20 gallons

If you’re looking for a peaceful, beautiful fish to add to your aquarium, the German blue ram (Mikrogeophagus ramirezi) is a great choice. This freshwater fish is native to the Orinoco River Basin in South America and is a popular fish among aquarium enthusiasts. German blue rams are relatively small fish. They are easily recognizable by their bright blue coloration, and their fins are edged in white or yellow.

German blue rams are peaceful fish that do well in community tanks. They prefer to live in groups, so it’s best to add at least six rams to your aquarium. They are not aggressive fish, and get along well with other peaceful fish species. German blue rams are not particularly active fish and prefer to spend most of their time hiding among plants or other aquarium decorations.

Electric Blue Ram

little bluefish

Care level: Moderate
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 1-2 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 10 gallons per fish

The electric blue ram is a species of freshwater fish in the cichlid family. The fish is native to the rivers and streams of South America, but has been introduced to other continents.

The body of the electric blue ram is blue in color, with a yellowish-to-orange belly. The fins are blue or black in color.

The electric blue ram is a peaceful fish that can be kept with other peaceful fish species. The fish is not aggressive and will not harm other fish.

Bolivian Ram

bolivian ram swim

Care level: Beginner
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 3.5 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 30 gallons

The Bolivian Ram is a freshwater fish native to Bolivia. It is a member of the cichlid family and is closely related to the angelfish. The Bolivian Ram is a popular aquarium fish and is often kept by beginner aquarium keepers.

The Bolivian Ram is a small fish, reaching a maximum size of about 3.5 inches. It is a peaceful fish that can be kept with other peaceful fish of similar size. The Bolivian Ram is a popular fish for aquariums because it is very hardy and can tolerate a wide range of water conditions.

The Bolivian Ram is an omnivore and will eat most types of aquarium foods, including flake food, pellets, and live foods. It is important to provide a varied diet to keep the Bolivian Ram healthy.

Silver Dollar

silver dollar fish

Care level: Intermediate
Temperament: Peaceful
Size: 6 inches
Diet: Omnivore
Minimum tank size: 75 gallons

Silver dollar fish (Metynnis argenteus) is a species of freshwater fish in the Characidae family. They are native to South America and typically found in the Amazon Basin.

Silver dollar fish are silver in color with a round body shape. They are popular fish for aquariums because of their unique appearance and peaceful nature.

Silver dollar fish are omnivorous, meaning they will eat both plants and animals. In the wild, their diet consists of small insects, crustaceans, and plants. In captivity, they can be fed a variety of foods, including pellets, flakes, and live foods.

Silver dollar fish are social creatures and do best when kept in groups.

Fish That You Shouldn’t Keep with Angelfish

Below you will learn about bad angelfish companions.

  • Barbs. Angelfish are not compatible with barbs because the barbs will nip at the angelfish. The barbs may also out-compete the angelfish for food.
  • Some species of Tetras. Many aquarists have tried to keep angel fish together with certain tetra species, but as a rule, nothing good comes of it in the end. The reason is that angelfish are simply too aggressive for most tetras. Angelfish often chase and bite tetras until they are stressed out and eventually die. In some cases, angel fish even eat the tetras.
  • Betta fish. While Angelfish and Betta fish are both beautiful creatures, they cannot live together. The reason for this is because Angelfish are peaceful fish that like to live in groups, while Betta fish are aggressive and territorial. Betta fish will often attack and even kill Angelfish, so it is best to keep them in separate tanks.
  • Goldfish. Angelfish and goldfish cannot live together because they have different water temperature requirements. Goldfish prefer water with a lower temperature.
  • Shrimps. Angelfish are predators and will eat small shrimp. They also like to dig and will uproot plants looking for food.

Watch the Following Video on Bad Angelfish Buddies

FAQs on Angelfish Tank Mates

Do Angelfish kill other fish?

Angelfish do not kill other fish on purpose. However, they may unintentionally kill smaller fish if they mistake them for food.

How many Angelfish can live together?

This answer could vary depending on the size of the aquarium, the type of Angelfish, and the water conditions. In general, Angelfish can live together in groups of 6 or more.

Can Oscars live with Angelfish?

Oscars can live with angelfish, but it is not recommended. Oscars are known to be aggressive and territorial, and they may attack and kill angelfish.

Can I keep just one Angelfish in a community tank?

No, Angelfish are a shoaling species and should be kept in groups of at least 4-6 individuals.

What bottom feeders can live with Angelfish?

Some recommended bottom dwellers for aquariums that also house angelfish are:

  • Cory Catfish
  • Common Plecostomus
  • Rubbernose Pleco
  • Bristlenose Pleco
  • Kuhli Loach

Conclusion — Think Carefully Before Choosing Angelfish Tank Mates

In this article, you learned “what fish can go with angelfish”. Overall, when it comes to finding the perfect pair for your angelfish, there are several things to consider. First, you need to make sure that the fish you choose is the right size for each other. Second, you need to consider the temperament of the fish you choose. Finally, make sure that the fish you choose are compatible in terms of keeping conditions.

Good mates for angelfish are the other peaceful fish you learned about in our article. All of these fish are compatible fish for angelfish in size and temperament, and they also prefer similar housing conditions to angel fish. When choosing partners for your angel fish, it is important to consider all of these factors to keep your fish happy and healthy together.

References:

  • Pterophyllum (Wikipedia): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pterophyllum
  • Kuhli loach (www.britannica.com): https://www.britannica.com/animal/kuhli-loach
  • Pelvicachromis pulcher (nas.er.usgs.gov): https://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/factsheet.aspx?SpeciesID=472

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