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Orange Eyed Blue Tiger Shrimp (Caridina cf. cantonensis var. “Blue Tiger”) Care Guide: Lifespan, Nutrition and Create Healthy Environment

The blue tiger shrimp is a beautiful and unique freshwater shrimp species. It is native to Southeast Asia and is found in Thailand, Vietnam, and Cambodia. The blue tiger shrimp is a popular aquarium shrimp …

Orange Eyed Blue Tiger Shrimp on the seaweed

The blue tiger shrimp is a beautiful and unique freshwater shrimp species. It is native to Southeast Asia and is found in Thailand, Vietnam, and Cambodia. The blue tiger shrimp is a popular aquarium shrimp and is also used in the ornamental shrimp trade.

Are Blue Tiger Shrimp Easy to Keep?
The blue tiger shrimp is a relatively easy shrimp to care for. They are hardy and can tolerate a wide range of water parameters. Blue tiger shrimp are also not picky eaters and will accept most types of food.

Blue Tiger Shrimp Key Care Stats

Scientific name:Caridina cf. cantonensis
Other name:Blue Tiger shrimp, Orange Eye Blue Tiger, BTS, Blue Neocaridina
Family:Atyidae
Care level:Easy
Size:1–1.5 inches (2.5–4 cm)
Life span:2–3 years
Minimum tank size:10 gallons (35–40L)
Tank set-up:Freshwater
Water pH:6.5–8.0
Temperature:64–82 °F (18–28 °C)
Recommended diet:Omnivore
Temperament:Peaceful

Species Summary

The blue tiger shrimp is a freshwater shrimp native to southern China. It is a popular aquarium shrimp and is often kept by hobbyists. Blue tiger shrimp is a member of the Atyidae family, which includes over 300 species of freshwater shrimp. The blue tiger shrimp is a relatively new species to the aquarium trade and was first described in 2006.

Where Do They Come From?

The blue tiger shrimp is native to southern China. It is found in the Pearl River Basin and in the Guangdong Province. They have also been introduced to Taiwan and Hong Kong.

How Long Do Orange-Eyed Blue Tiger Shrimp Live for?

The lifespan of the orange-eyed blue tiger shrimp is typically 2–3 years. However, some individual shrimp have been known to live for up to 5 years. This species is known to be very sensitive to water quality and changes in water parameters. As a result, shrimp that are kept in poor water conditions typically have a shorter lifespan.

How Big Do Blue Tigers Grow?

The blue tiger shrimp typically grows to a size of 1.5–2.0 inches (3.8–5.1 cm). The females are typically larger than the males because they are able to store more eggs.

Blue Tiger Shrimp Anatomy, Appearance, & Varieties

Orange Eyed Blue Tiger Shrimp on a substrate in the aquarium

The Neocaridina family tree has many different branches. The vast majority of these branches are made up of different color morphs that have been selectively bred by shrimp farmers over the years. There are a few other types similar to it such as the Red Cherry shrimp, the Yellow shrimp, and the Chocolate shrimp. The Blue Tiger shrimp is easily distinguished by its blue body and black stripes. It is a very beautiful shrimp that is very popular among shrimp keepers. The most popular of these color morphs is the Blue Tiger shrimp.

The Blue Tiger shrimp is a variety of Caridina cantonensis. It is a freshwater shrimp indigenous to China and Taiwan.  Blue Tiger shrimp gets its name from its striking blue coloration, which is a result of a genetic mutation. This shrimp is a popular aquarium pet and is prized for its beautiful coloration.

The Blue Tiger shrimp is a beautiful shrimp that is blue with black stripes. The stripes are not always evenly spaced or the same width. Some Blue Freshwater Shrimp may have wider stripes while others may have thinner stripes. The amount of blue on the shrimp can also vary from shrimp to shrimp. Some shrimp may be mostly blue while others may be mostly black. Also, these shrimp like to live in groups, so it is best to keep them in pairs or groups of 5 or more.

The Blue Tiger shrimp is a peaceful shrimp that gets along well with other shrimp and fish. They are not aggressive and will not bother other shrimp or fish. The Blue Tiger shrimp is a very active shrimp. They are constantly moving around and exploring their surroundings. They are very curious and will often come up to the glass to see what you are doing.

The Blue Tiger shrimp is a very popular shrimp among shrimp keepers. They are very easy to care for and are a great shrimp for beginners. They are very hardy and can tolerate a wide range of water conditions. The Blue Tiger shrimp can live in both fresh and salt water. They are also very easy to breed. The Blue Tiger shrimp is a great shrimp to have in a community tank.

Male and Female Difference

The Blue Tiger shrimp is a hermaphrodite shrimp. This means that they have both male and female reproductive organs. However, they cannot self-fertilize. They must mate with other shrimp in order to produce offspring. The easiest way to tell the difference between a male and a female Blue Tiger shrimp is by looking at their abdomen. The male shrimp will have a much larger and wider abdomen than the female. The female shrimp will have a smaller and narrower abdomen. The male shrimp will also have a large bulge on their underside where their sperm is stored.

Blue Tiger shrimp can mate with any other shrimp that is the same species as them. However, they will usually only mate with shrimp that are the same color as them. This is because they are attracted to shrimp that look like them. Also, when two different color shrimp mate, the offspring are usually a mix of the two colors. For example, if a Blue Tiger shrimp mates with a Red Cherry shrimp, the offspring will be a mix of blue and red.

How Much are Tiger Shrimps?

Tiger shrimp prices can vary depending on the size and quantity that you purchase. You can expect to pay anywhere from $5 to $15 per shrimp. Also, the price will be higher if you purchase them from a specialty store or online retailer.

Blue Tiger Shrimp Care & Tank Requirements

Orange Eyed Blue Tiger Shrimp on substrate in the tank

The Blue Tiger Shrimp (Caridina cf. cantonensis var. “Blue Tiger”) is a beautiful and popular shrimp among aquarists. They are relatively easy to care for as long as their tank requirements are met. This care guide will cover everything you need to know about keeping Blue Tiger Shrimp healthy and happy in your aquarium.

The Best Aquarium Size for Blue Tiger Shrimps

The Blue Tiger Shrimp (Caridina cf. cantonensis var. “Blue Tiger”) is a beautiful and popular shrimp among aquarists. They are relatively easy to care for as long as their tank requirements are met. This care guide will cover everything you need to know about keeping Blue Tiger Shrimp healthy and happy in your aquarium.

Water Parameters

Blue Tiger Shrimp are very sensitive to water quality and parameters. They require clean, well-filtered water with little to no ammonia, nitrites, or nitrates. A water change of 30-50% should be done every week to maintain water quality. The ideal water temperature for Blue Tiger Shrimp is 70-78 degrees Fahrenheit. Ammonia and nitrite levels should be 0 ppm. Nitrate levels should be as low as possible, ideally below 20 ppm.

Also, Blue Tiger Shrimp require a high amount of dissolved oxygen in their water. An airstone or other form of aeration is necessary to provide them with enough dissolved oxygen. This can be accomplished by running an air pump and air stone in the aquarium. These shrimp like to stay close to the bottom of the tank and prefer slow-moving water.

pH: 6.5–7.5
GH: 5–8
Temperature: 65–82 °F (18–28 °C)
Ammonia: 0
Nitrite: 0
Nitrate: 20–40 ppm

Filtration

Blue Tiger Shrimp are very sensitive to water quality and need a well-filtered aquarium. A good filtration system will help to keep the water clean and free of harmful ammonia and nitrites. A canister or hang-on-back filter is a good option for filtering their water.

Also, be sure to do regular water changes of at least 10-15% every week to keep the water quality high. This will also help to keep the shrimp’s stress levels low, so they can stay healthy and active.

Do Blue Tiger Shrimp Need Air Pump?

Blue Tiger Shrimp require an air pump in their tank in order to provide them with the necessary oxygen. The air pump should be strong enough to maintain a steady water flow throughout the tank. The Blue Tiger Shrimp will also benefit from a filter that can help to keep the water clean and free of debris. Also, air stones can be used in the tank to help provide oxygen to the shrimp.

Aquarium Lighting

Blue Tiger Shrimp do not require special lighting and will do well under standard aquarium lighting. However, they will benefit from the addition of some floating plants to help diffuse the light and provide them with some shelter. Also, be sure to avoid any lighting that produces too much heat as this can be harmful to shrimp.

Plants and Decorations

Since Blue Tiger Shrimp are relatively small, they need plenty of hiding spots and places to forage for food. A heavily planted aquarium with plenty of driftwood and rocks is ideal. Be sure to use live plants that are safe for shrimp and avoid using any plants that are known to be toxic to shrimp.

Also, avoid using any decorations that could potentially tear the shrimp’s delicate exoskeleton. The Blue Tiger Shrimp is a peaceful species that does well in a community aquarium with other peaceful fish and shrimp. These shrimp likes to spend most of their time near the bottom of the tank. so make sure there is plenty of space for them to swim around and forage for food.

What’s the Best Substrate for Orange Eyed Blue Tiger Shrimps?

The Blue Tiger Shrimp is a scavenger and will spend a good amount of time looking for food on the substrate. A fine substrate such as sand or gravel is best so that the shrimp can easily sift through it. A coarse substrate can damage the shrimp’s delicate skin. Also, avoid using substrates that are sharp or jagged as they can also damage the shrimp’s skin. The shrimp will also appreciate some hiding places in the form of rocks, driftwood, or plants.

Orange Eyed Blue Tiger Shrimp on a substrate in the aquarium

Food & Diet

The Blue Tiger Shrimp is a beautiful and popular shrimp in the aquarium hobby. They are named for their striking blue coloration and tiger-like stripes. These shrimp are not difficult to care for, but there are a few things to keep in mind in order to keep them healthy and thriving.

The Blue Tiger Shrimp is a scavenger and will eat just about anything. In the wild, they will eat algae, detritus, and small insects. In the aquarium, they will gladly accept most kinds of shrimp pellets and flakes, as well as frozen or live foods. It is important to provide them with a varied diet to ensure that they are getting all the nutrients they need.

What Can I Feed Blue Tiger Shrimp?

Blue Tiger shrimp are omnivorous and will eat a variety of foods. They are particularly fond of algae and detritus, so a tank with plenty of live plants is ideal. They will also consume most commercial shrimp foods, as well as frozen or live foods such as brine shrimp, daphnia, and bloodworms. It is important to provide a variety of foods to ensure a balanced diet. Here are some of our favorite foods for Blue Tiger shrimp:

  • Algae Wafers. Algae wafers are a great staple food for Blue Tiger shrimp. They are packed with nutrients and will help to keep the tank clean.
  • Brine Shrimp. Brine shrimp are a favorite food of Blue Tiger shrimp. They are high in protein and essential fatty acids.
  • Bloodworms. Bloodworms are another favorite food of Blue Tiger shrimp. They are high in protein and essential nutrients.
  • Vegetables. They will also consume most vegetables. Some of our favorites include kale, spinach, and zucchini.
  • Fruit. This shrimp will also consume most fruits. Some of our favorites include mango, papaya, and watermelon.

It is important to remember that Blue Tiger shrimp are very small and have a very small stomach. As a result, they should only be fed small amounts of food at a time. Overfeeding can lead to water quality issues and can be fatal to Blue Tiger shrimp. Also remember, they can eat plants in their aquarium if they are properly acclimated.

How Often Do Blue Tiger Shrimp Need to Be Fed?

Orange Eyed Blue Tiger Shrimp on a rocks in the tank

Blue Tiger shrimp should be fed 2–3 times per week. A good rule of thumb is to offer them as much food as they can eat in 2 minutes. Be sure to remove any uneaten food after this time period to avoid polluting the water. Also, be sure to offer a variety of foods to ensure they are getting the nutrients they need. The Blue Tiger shrimp is omnivorous and will eat both plant and animal matter.

How Long Can a Blue Tiger Shrimp Go Without Food?

A Blue Tiger shrimp can go without food for a few days without any problems. If you are planning to be away from home for an extended period of time, it is best to leave a small amount of food in the tank for them to graze on. One of the best foods to leave for them is algae wafers. These can be found at most pet stores that sell aquarium supplies.

Also, you may use automatic feeders, however, make sure to get one that can dispense small enough pellets for the Blue Tiger shrimp. The last thing you want is for your shrimp to get stuck in the feeder or for the pellets to be too large and cause problems with their digestive system. The rule of thumb is to never leave your shrimp without food for more than 3 days.

Watch the Following Video on How to Care for OEBT Shrimp

Here is a video on Youtube that goes over you need to know about keeping Blue Tiger shrimp:

Behavior & Temperament

The blue tiger shrimp is a peaceful and hardy species that is well suited for the beginner shrimp keeper. They are not known to be aggressive towards either their own species or other tank mates, making them a good choice for community aquariums. They are a relatively active shrimp and will often be seen grazing on surfaces in the aquarium or scavenging for food in the substrate.

The blue tiger shrimp is a brightly colored shrimp that gets its name from its striking blue and orange coloration. The body of the shrimp is transparent with dark blue stripes running along the length of the body. The head and claws of the shrimp are orange in color. The blue tiger shrimp is a relatively small species, with adults reaching a maximum size of around 2 inches.

The Blue Tiger shrimp is a peaceful and hardy species that is a great addition to any freshwater aquarium. They are not aggressive and can be kept with a variety of different fish, snails, and other shrimp. They are known to be good algae eaters and will help to keep your aquarium clean.

Good Tank Mates

Orange Eyed Blue Tiger Shrimp and other shrimps in the tank

The blue tiger shrimp is a peaceful species that can be kept with a wide variety of tank mates. They can be kept with other peaceful shrimp and fish species, as well as with snails and other invertebrates. Some good tank mates for blue tiger shrimp include:

  • Cherry shrimp
  • Crystal red shrimp
  • Amano shrimp
  • Neon tetras
  • Otocinclus catfish
  • Plecostomus
  • Nerite snails

The best way to ensure compatibility between your blue tiger shrimp and other tank mates is to choose species that have similar water requirements.

Unsafe Tank Mates

Although blue tiger shrimp are generally peaceful, there are some tank mates that can pose a threat to them. These include fish that are known to be aggressive towards shrimp or other invertebrates, as well as fish that may try to eat them. It is best to avoid keeping blue tiger shrimp with fish that fall into either of these categories. Here are some examples of fish that should not be kept with blue tiger shrimp:

  • Cichlids
  • Catfish
  • Loaches
  • Gouramis
  • Goldfish
  • Bettas

You should avoid keeping blue tiger shrimp with any fish that are known to be aggressive or predatory. They may also be harassed by fish that are much larger than them.

Blue Tiger Shrimp Breeding

Orange Eyed Blue Tiger Shrimp and babies Orange Eyed Blue Tiger Shrimp in the tank

The blue tiger shrimp is a striking color morph of the common tiger shrimp, Caridina cf. cantonensis. Blue tigers are not a separate species from tiger shrimp but rather a color variation that can occur in any tiger shrimp population. While blue tigers are not as common as their orange-eyed cousins, they are becoming increasingly popular among shrimp hobbyists due to their striking blue coloration. While blue tigers are not as easy to breed as other shrimp species, they are not impossible to breed. In fact, with a little patience and knowledge, almost anyone can successfully breed blue tigers.

The first step to successful blue tiger breeding is to set up a shrimp tank. This tank should be at least 5 gallons in size, and should have a sponge filter and a heater set to 78-82 degrees Fahrenheit. The tank should also have plenty of live plants, as well as some hiding places for the shrimp. Once the shrimp tank is set up, the next step is to find some blue tigers.

The next step is to find some suitable mates for your blue tigers. While blue tigers can breed with other shrimp species, it is best to find other blue tigers to mate with. This will help to ensure that your blue tigers retain their striking blue coloration.

Once you have found some suitable mates for your blue tigers, it is time to start the breeding process. Blue tigers will typically start breeding when they are around 4-6 months old. The breeding process is very similar to that of other shrimp species. The female shrimp will lay her eggs in a secluded area of the shrimp tank, and the male shrimp will fertilize them. Once the eggs have been fertilized, the female shrimp will carry them around on her swimmerets until they hatch.

Once the eggs hatch, the baby shrimp will be very small and will need to be fed very carefully. Baby shrimp can be fed commercially available shrimp food, as well as finely chopped vegetables and fruits. It is important to remember that baby shrimp are very delicate, and care must be taken to not overfeed them.

The baby shrimp look like miniature versions of their parents and will grow very quickly. In just a few months, they will be ready to breed themselves. Also, remember that as long as there are newborn shrimps in the tank, you should be careful with the filter because the babies can easily get sucked into it.

As the baby shrimp grow, they will slowly start to develop their striking blue coloration. Once they reach adulthood, they will be fully blue and will be ready to start the breeding process all over again.

FAQs on How to Care for Orange Eyed Blue Tiger Shrimp

Are Orange Eyed shrimp blind?

No, they are not blind. The Orange Eyed shrimp have very good vision and can see in both light and dark conditions. They use their large eyes to help them find food and avoid predators.

Will Tiger shrimp breed with Cherry?

No, they will not. The Orange Eyed shrimp are a different species from Cherry shrimp, and they are not compatible for breeding. But they can live peacefully together in the same tank.

Can you mix red and blue shrimp?

Yes, you can mix red and blue shrimp together without any problems. In fact, many shrimp keepers like to mix different colors of shrimp together to create a more interesting and colorful aquarium.

Do Tiger shrimps need a tank heater?

Tiger shrimp are tropical animals and prefer warm water. A tank heater is not strictly necessary, but it will help them stay healthy and active. The ideal water temperature for Tiger shrimp is around 64–80 °F (18–28 °C).

How many Orange Eyed Blue Tiger shrimps can I keep in a 10-gallon tank?

Ideally, you should keep 5-10 Orange Eyed Blue Tiger shrimps in a 10-gallon tank. This will allow them enough space to move around and stay healthy. Also, make sure to provide them with plenty of hiding places and vegetation.

Closing Thoughts

Caridina cf. cantonensis var. “Blue Tiger” is a beautiful shrimp that does well in both freshwater and brackish water aquariums. They are peaceful shrimp that get along well with other shrimp and fish. The biggest thing to remember when keeping these shrimp is to make sure the water quality is good and that the shrimp have plenty of hiding places.

If you have any questions about Caridina cf. cantonensis var. “Blue Tiger” or if you want to share your own experiences with these shrimp, please leave a comment below.

References:

  • Classification of Atyidae (by Timothy J Page)
    https://www.researchgate.net/figure/New-classification-of-Atyidae_tbl2_315521549
  • Strong genetic differentiation among populations of the freshwater shrimp Caridina cantonensis in Hong Kong: implications for conservation of freshwater fauna in urban areas (by Ling Ming Tsang, Kwok Ho Tsoi, Simon Kin-Fung Chan, Tony King-Tung Chan, and Ka Hou Chu)
    https://www.publish.csiro.au/MF/MF15377

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