Orange Pumpkin Shrimp (Neocaridina davidi) Care Guide: Lifespan, Nutrition and Create Healthy Environment

Hello, and welcome to my guide on keeping Orange Pumpkin Shrimp. This species is a beautiful, striking shrimp that is a real joy to keep. Orange pumpkins are not difficult to care for and make …

orange pumpkin shrimp sitting on rocks

Hello, and welcome to my guide on keeping Orange Pumpkin Shrimp. This species is a beautiful, striking shrimp that is a real joy to keep. Orange pumpkins are not difficult to care for and make excellent additions to planted aquariums. They are peaceful, non-aggressive, and will not bother other shrimp or fish in the tank.

This guide will teach you everything you need to know about keeping orange pumpkin shrimp successfully. I will cover different topics such as diet, habitat, tank mates, and much more. By the end of this guide, you will be an expert on everything orange pumpkin shrimp! Let’s go!

Orange Sakura Shrimp Key Care Stats

Scientific name: Neocaridina denticulata sinensis
Other name: Orange Sakura shrimp, Chinese Dwarf Orange shrimp, Sakura shrimp
Origin: China
Color form: Orange
Size: 1–2 inches (2.5–5 cm)
Life span: 1–2 years
Best kept: In groups of 6 or more
Minimum tank size: 5 gallons
Tank set-up: Freshwater
Water pH: 6.5–7.5
Temperature: 64–78 °F (18–26 °C)
Care level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Diet: Omnivore

Species Summary

Pumpkin shrimp are a beautiful addition to any aquarium. They are peaceful and make great tank mates for other shrimp and small fish. Pumpkin shrimp are easy to care for and are great beginner shrimp.

Where Do They Come From?

Pumpkin shrimp are native to Thailand and are found in slow-moving streams and rivers. They are a detrivore and will eat just about anything.

How Long Do Orange Sakura Live for?

Pumpkin shrimp can live for 2-3 years with proper care. They are slow-growing shrimp, so they will take some time to reach their full size. Also, they are more susceptible to diseases since they are slow-growing shrimp.

How Big Do Orange Pumpkin Shrimp Grow?

Pumpkin shrimp grow to be about 1.5–2 inches (4–5 cm) long. They are small shrimp and are very peaceful.

Orange Pumpkin Shrimp Anatomy, Appearance, & Varieties

Orange Pumpkin Shrimp in the tank

The Orange Pumpkin Shrimp is a member of the family Atyidae, which contains over 300 species of shrimp. Orange Pumpkin Shrimp is the only member of the genus Cucurbita.

The Orange Pumpkin Shrimp is a small shrimp, reaching a maximum length of 2.5 cm (1 in). It is orange in color, with dark spots on its body. These shrimp is a popular aquarium shrimp and is often kept as a pet.

The Orange Pumpkin Shrimp is a peaceful shrimp that does well in a community tank. It is an omnivore and will eat a variety of foods, including algae, detritus, and small invertebrates.

Orange Pumpkin Shrimp is a popular aquarium shrimp and is often kept as a pet. Also called the Taiwan Bee Shrimp, it is orange in coloration with dark spots on its body. It is a peaceful shrimp that does well in a community tank.

There are a few different similar shrimp types that are easily confused with the Orange Pumpkin shrimp. These include the following: Carmen Shrimp, Yellow Fire Shrimp, Crystal Red Shrimp, Orange Sunkist Shrimp, and Red Cherry Shrimp.

How Much Does an Orange Pumpkin Shrimp Cost?

The average price for orange pumpkin shrimp for your aquarium is about $4 per shrimp.

This price can go up or down depending on the size, quality, and where you purchase them. Also, keep in mind that you’ll need to purchase some plants and decorations for your aquarium as well. So, your shrimp will need a place to hide and feel comfortable.

Orange Pumpkin Shrimp Care & Tank Requirements

The orange pumpkin shrimp is a striking invertebrate that is native to the brackish and fresh waters of Southeast Asia. It gets its name from its vivid orange coloration, which is accented by black spots. This shrimp is a popular addition to both freshwater and brackish aquariums. It is peaceful, relatively easy to care for, and makes a beautiful addition to any shrimp tank.

The Best Aquarium Size for Orange Pumpkin Shrimps

Orange Pumpkin Shrimp sits on algae in an aquarium

A single orange pumpkin shrimp needs at least 2.5 gallons of water, but a 5-gallon or larger aquarium is ideal. If you plan on keeping multiple shrimp, you will need to increase the size of your aquarium accordingly. For example, a 10-gallon aquarium could comfortably house 4-6 orange pumpkin shrimp. Also, be sure to include plenty of hiding places and plenty of live plants in your shrimp tank.

Water Parameters

The orange pumpkin shrimp requires water with a temperature between 72–86 degrees Fahrenheit, a hardness of 5–20 dGH, and a pH of 6.5–8.0. This shrimp is relatively tolerant of different water parameters, but it is important to maintain stable conditions in the aquarium.

For optimal health, the orange pumpkin shrimp requires a well-oxygenated aquarium with plenty of hiding places. This shrimp is not particularly active and does not need a lot of space. A 10-gallon aquarium is sufficient for a small group of orange pumpkin shrimp.

Filtration

Since the orange pumpkin shrimp is a scavenger, it is important to have a good filtration system in place. A canister filter or a hang-on-back filter will work well. Be sure to include a sponge filter to provide mechanical filtration and a place for the shrimp to hide. Also, be sure to change the filter media regularly. It is also a good idea to do weekly water changes of about 10-15%.

Do Orange Pumpkin Shrimp Need Air Pump?

The orange pumpkin shrimp requires an air pump in order to maintain proper water quality. The air pump also provides the shrimp with much-needed oxygen. These shrimp are very sensitive to water quality and need clean, well-aerated water to thrive. Then an air pump is a necessary piece of equipment for any orange pumpkin shrimp tank.

Aquarium Lighting

Orange pumpkin shrimp do best in an aquarium with moderate lighting. They do not require special lighting, but too much light can cause them stress. If you are keeping them in a freshwater aquarium, you can use any type of lighting. If you are keeping them in a brackish aquarium, you will need to use a light that is designed for brackish water. Also, be sure to provide them with plenty of hiding places so they can escape the light if they need to.

Plants and Decorations

The orange pumpkin shrimp is a peaceful species that does well in both freshwater and brackish aquariums. It is important to provide plenty of hiding places and plenty of live plants for this shrimp. They are not particular about plant species, but they do prefer plants with soft, smooth leaves. Some good plant choices for an orange pumpkin shrimp tank include:

  • Java fern
  • Anubias
  • Bacopa
  • Cabomba
  • Hornwort

In addition to plants, you can also add driftwood, rocks, and other decorations to your shrimp tank. Just be sure that any decorations you add are free of sharp edges that could injure the shrimp.

What’s the Best Substrate for Orange Sunkist Shrimps?

The orange pumpkin shrimp requires a substrate that is fine and smooth in order to prevent damage to its delicate body. A sandy substrate is ideal, but you can also use smooth gravel or even a bare-bottom tank. Be sure to avoid any substrates with sharp edges that could cut or tear the shrimp’s skin. Also, avoid using substrates that contain high levels of copper, as this can be toxic to shrimp.

Food & Diet

Pumpkin shrimp are a species of ornamental shrimp that are popular in the aquarium trade. They are native to fresh and brackish waters in Southeast Asia, where they are found in Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia. Pumpkin shrimp are omnivorous and will feed on a variety of food sources, including algae, detritus, and small invertebrates. In the wild, they are often found near the substrate, where they scavenge for food.

What Can I Feed Orange Sakura shrimp?

A varied diet is the key to keeping your Sakura shrimp healthy and happy. They are omnivorous and will accept most aquarium foods, including flakes, pellets, freeze-dried foods, and live foods. Algae is an important part of their diet, and they will also graze on detritus and small invertebrates.

To ensure a balanced diet, it is best to offer a variety of food sources. A good diet for Sakura shrimp should include:

  1. Algae – both live and frozen algae are good choices.
  2. Pellets or flakes – choose a high-quality pellet or flake food that is rich in algae or other plant matter.
  3. Freeze-dried foods – these are good supplemental food, but should not be the only food offered.
  4. Live foods – live foods, such as brine shrimp or bloodworms, are a great way to add variety to your shrimp’s diet.

Also, remember to remove any uneaten food after a few hours to prevent water quality problems.

How Often Do Orange Pumpkin Shrimp Need to Be Fed?

Pumpkin shrimp should be fed 1-2 times per day. They are not fast growers, so they do not need a lot of food. A good rule of thumb is to offer them as much food as they can eat in 2 minutes. If you are feeding them live food, such as brine shrimp or bloodworms, you may need to feed them more often.

How Long Can an Orange Pumpkin Shrimp Go Without Food?

A healthy orange pumpkin shrimp can go without food for a period of 2-3 weeks. If the shrimp are kept in an aquarium with other shrimp or fish, it is important to ensure that there is enough food to go around so that the shrimp do not become malnourished. Also, if the shrimp is molting, it will not eat during this time.

Watch the Following Video on Orange Sunkist Shrimp

Here is a great video that covers everything you need to know about caring for Orange Sunkist shrimp:

Behavior & Temperament

Pumpkin shrimp are a peaceful, hardy species that make a great addition to any nano aquarium. They are relatively easy to care for and are known to be one of the more resilient shrimp species in the hobby. Pumpkin shrimp are a great choice for beginner shrimpkeepers.

Pumpkin shrimp are a fun and active species that will bring both movement and color to your aquarium. They are known to be very curious and will often approach new objects in their environment. Pumpkin shrimp are also known to be good jumpers, so be sure to cover your aquarium well.

Pumpkin shrimp are a peaceful, social species that do well in groups. They are an active species that is constantly on the move in the aquarium. They are not aggressive towards other tank mates and can be kept with a variety of different fish. These shrimp are very easy to care for and are a great addition to any aquarium. Pumpkin shrimp are a great addition to any nano aquarium. They are peaceful and relatively easy to care for, making them a great choice for beginner shrimp keepers.

Good Tank Mates

Orange Pumpkin Shrimp and other shrimp in the tank

Pumpkin shrimp are peaceful and make good tank mates with other peaceful community fish and shrimp. They should not be kept with larger, more aggressive fish that may view them as a food source. Here are some suggested tank mates for pumpkin shrimp:

  • Cherry shrimp
  • Crystal red shrimp
  • Tiger shrimp
  • Bamboo shrimp
  • Cardinal tetras
  • Corydoras catfish
  • Otocinclus catfish

The main thing to avoid when choosing tank mates for pumpkin shrimp are fish that are known to nip at shrimp or have a voracious appetite.

Unsafe Tank Mates

Pumpkin shrimp should not be kept with any fish that are known to be fin nippers or eat small invertebrates. Here is a list of some unsafe tank mates:

  • Betta fish
  • Guppies
  • Neon Tetras
  • Angelfish
  • Oscars

Remember, even fish that are not typically aggressive can become so when they are kept in an environment that is too small or crowded. It is always best to err on the side of caution when choosing tank mates for your pumpkin shrimp.

Orange Sakura Shrimp Breeding

orange sakura shrimp breeding

Pumpkin shrimp are not difficult to breed and can be bred in a community tank. The female shrimp will carry the eggs for about two weeks before they hatch. After the eggs hatch, the fry will be free-swimming and should be able to find food on their own.

The female shrimp can breed again about two weeks after she has given birth. Also, it is not necessary to have male and female shrimp to breed. A group of females will often produce offspring without the presence of a male. You can expect to see about 10–20 fry per clutch.

Pumpkin shrimp are easy to breed and will often produce large numbers of offspring. The female shrimp will carry the eggs for approximately 30 days before they hatch. Once the eggs hatch, the fry will be extremely small and will require very small food sources, such as infusoria, to survive.

FAQs on How to Care for Orange Sunkist Shrimp

When are Orange Pumpkin shrimp ready to breed?

Orange Pumpkin shrimp are generally ready to breed when they reach maturity, which is typically around 6 to 8 months of age. Also, like most shrimp, they are seasonal breeders and tend to breed more actively during the warmer months.

How often do Orange shrimp breed?

Orange Pumpkin shrimp typically breed every 4 to 6 weeks. These shrimp are also known to produce multiple clutches of eggs at a time, so that they can be quite prolific breeders.

How long are Orange shrimp pregnant for?

Gestation period for Orange Pumpkin shrimp is typically around 2 weeks. They will carry their eggs until they are ready to hatch, at which point the female will release them into the water.

Do Orange Pumpkin shrimp molt?

Yes, like all shrimp, Orange Pumpkin shrimps molt periodically throughout their lives in order to grow. They typically molt every 4 to 6 weeks, but this can vary depending on the individual shrimp and environmental conditions.

Do Orange Sakura shrimp eat algae?

Yes, Orange Sakura shrimp are great at eating algae and can help to keep your aquarium clean. They are especially fond of soft, stringy algae.

Closing Thoughts

Orange pumpkin shrimp are a beautiful and interesting addition to your freshwater shrimp aquarium. They are very active and fun to watch but do be aware that they are known to eat smaller fish and shrimp. To avoid losing your other fish and shrimp to these little predators, make sure you keep them well-fed and avoid overcrowding your aquarium.

Have you tried keeping a clownfish before? How did it go? If you have any questions about this species, feel free to leave a comment below. Tell us about your experiences with them in the comments below!

References:

  • Experiences on importance of diet for shrimp postlarval quality (by Patrick Lavens, Patrick Sorgeloos)
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/222692006_Experiences_on_importance_of_diet_for_shrimp_postlarval_quality
  • Cherry Shrimp Neocaridina davidi (Bouvier 1904. Crustacea: Decopoda: Atyidae) by Carrie Suen and Jennifer L. Gillett-Kaufman
    https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdf/IN/IN130100.pdf

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